CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Página 8 de 11. Precedente  1, 2, 3 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  Siguiente

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Vie Feb 10, 2017 6:33 am

esperemos se concreten pronto los restantes sistemas de defensa aérea .

Por lo pronto ,las fuentes más confiables reportan la adquisición de al menos DOS grupos S-300.
avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Mar Feb 14, 2017 12:22 pm

Revisando datos con gonzalo jimenez :POR NINGÚN LADO sale que son tres S-300,POR TODOS LADOS,las fuentes reseñan DOS! grupos de S-300VM-2500..lo digo para no caer en las especulaciones locas de gente como el cizañero y sus alter egos o antenas repetidoras de mentiras...por cierto,el cizañero ya no habla más de misiles HJ-73D con barra de tungsteno perforante-rebotadora...la mentira tiene patas cortas. Laughing Laughing

El james bond sexagenario venezolano virtual,tampoco aparece repitiendo que el t-72b1 pelado es "idóneo",o por lo menos,ya no engatusan a nadie con sus embustes ,parece que las mentiras pesan casi tanto como los años ,y no resisten el paso del tiempo....los embustes siempre salen a flote,cual mojón flotador.
avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Dom Feb 19, 2017 8:46 pm

Un artículo muy interesante para ubicarnos en las posibilidades del IADSvenezolano,y porque este es temible para cualquier potencial invasor

http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-2009-02.html

Surviving the Modern
Integrated Air Defence System

Air Power Australia Analysis 2009-02
  3rd February 2009

by Dr Carlo Kopp, SMAIAA, MIEEE, PEng 

©  2008, 2009 Carlo Kopp







Abstract

The United States and its Allies have relied since the end of the Cold War upon the ability to quickly overwhelm an opposing IADS, and the ability to then deliver massed precision firepower from the air, as the weapon of choice in resolving nation state conflicts.

The reality of evolving IADS technology and its global proliferation is that most of the US Air Force combat aircraft fleet, and all of the US Navy combat aircraft fleet, will be largely impotent against an IADS constructed from the technology available today from Russian and, increasingly so, Chinese manufacturers. 

If flown against such an IADS, US legacy fighters from the F-15 through to the current production F/A-18E/F would suffer prohibitive combat losses attempting to penetrate, suppress or destroy such an IADS.

The IADS technology in question is currently being deployed by China, Iran, Venezuela, and other nations, most of which have poor relationships with the Western alliance.

Until the US Air Force deploys significant numbers of the intended New Generation Bomber post 2020, only aircraft types in the US arsenal will be capable of penetrating, suppressing and destroying such an IADS – the B-2A Spirit and the F-22A Raptor.

There are only twenty B-2As in existence and retooling to manufacture a B-2C is an expensive approach given the commitment to the New Generation Bomber.

The United States therefore has only one remaining strategic choice at this time. That strategic choice is to manufacture a sufficient number of F-22A Raptors to provide a credible capability to conduct a substantial air campaign using only the B-2A and F-22A fleets.

The expectation that the US can get by with a small “golden bullet” fleet of stealth aircraft to carve holes in IADS to permit legacy aircraft to attack is no longer credible. The difficulty in locating and killing the new generation of self propelled and highly survivable IADS radars and launchers presents the prospect of a replay of the 1999 OAF campaign, with highly lethal SAM systems waiting in ambush, and mostly evading SEAD/DEAD attacks.

The F-22A Raptor will therefore have to perform the full spectrum of penetrating roles, starting with counter-air, and encompassing SEAD/DEAD, penetrating ISR and precision strike against strategic and tactical targets. The B-2A fleet can robustly bolster capabilities, but the small number of these superb aircraft available will result inevitably in very selective use.

If we assume an aircraft configuration reflecting the planned F-22A Block 40 configuration, and a contingency of similar magnitude to Desert Storm in 1991, then the required number of F-22A aircraft to cover the spectrum of penetrating roles is of the order of 500 to 600 aircraft in  total.

The United States no longer has any real choices in this matter, if it wishes to retain its secure global strategic position in the 2010 – 2020 time window. Any other force structure model will result in a nett loss of strategic potential, and produce strategic risks, which neither the US nor its Allies can afford.







We must preserve our unparalleled airpower capabilities to deter and defeat any conventional competitors, swiftly respond to crises across the globe, and support our ground forces.”
Defense Policy Agenda Statement,
Obama Administration, 2009
Disclaimer: No classified materials needed to be used, nor were classified materials used in the preparation of this analysis.
The stunning successes achieved in US led air campaigns since 1991 have been owed more than anything to the US technological and operational capabilities to penetrate and suppress opposing Integrated Air Defence Systems (IADS).
Ongoing technological evolution of IADS capabilities since 1991, and a failure by the US to further evolve its once formidable relative capabilities, now present the prospect of the US being unable to achieve a decisive advantage in an air campaign, either quickly or with low expenditures in aircraft and aircrew losses.
At this point in time the US has firm commitments for only 183 F-22A Raptor aircraft, and an operational fleet of only 20 B-2A Spirit stealth bombers. Yet these are the only aircraft capable of surviving in the kind of IADS environment we now see emerging globally.
To best appreciate exactly how and why this strategic change has occurred, and occurred so pervasively, it is necessary to explore defence penetration strategies, Russian and Chinese technological strategy in IADS evolution, and how these strategies are manifested in specific designs for IADS components.



IADS Evolution




The subject of technological strategies and countering technological adaptations for penetrating IADS has been recently detailed in [1][2][3][4] and [5]. However, to date we have yet to see a more comprehensive analysis of the ongoing trends in this evolution.
Until the advent of the F-117A during the mid 1980s, tasked in a large part with crippling key command posts in an opposing IADS, Western defence penetration and IADS suppression strategies were essentially a sophisticated but linear evolution of techniques first pioneered during the 1940s Combined Bomber Offensive over Germany.
During that period the RAF and USAAF first employed standoff jamming and escort jamming aircraft, but also employed low altitude penetration below radar coverage on numerous critical bombing raids. The British pioneered the model of Suppression/Destruction of Enemy Air Defences (SEAD/DEAD) flying rocket and gun armed Typhoon fighters against Luftwaffe search and acquisition radars. It is also significant that the Germans pioneered the Surface to Air Missile (SAM) with their Wasserfall ands Rheintochter designs, neither of which achieved operational status, but both of which provided the technological jumpstart for US, British and Soviet developments post-war [6],  [7].
The protracted Vietnam conflict provided the next important stage in this evolution, as the Soviets deployed the S-75/SA-2 Guideline SAM en masse to defend North Vietnam, and the US developed and deployed specialised EB-66, EA-6A/B and EKA-3B tactical jamming and anti-radiation missile firing EF-100F, A-6B, F-105G and EF-4C SEAD aircraft to cripple this IADS. In parallel the US deployed the F-111A which used automatic terrain following to evade SAM acquisition and engagement radars [8], [9], [10], [11].
While opinions and assessments often differ widely on the success of the US SEAD/DEAD campaign in Vietnam, what is abundantly clear is that the combination of jamming and lethal attacks against missile batteries and supporting radars worked, to the extent that sustainable loss rates in penetrating bombers were achieved. In this respect the combination of jamming and lethal attacks must be considered to be the winner, as the IADS strategic aim of achieving unsustainable bomber loss rates was simply not achieved. Against the tens of thousands of sorties flown, the success rate of the SAMs was not good enough to deter penetration.
The 1973 Yom Kippur conflict presented a mixed outcome. Initially the highly mobile Soviet supplied 2K12 ZRK Kub / SA-6 Gainful and static S-125 Neva / SA-3 Goa inflicted significant loss rates on Israeli fighter aircraft, but innovative low level flying tactics and use of land manoeuvre forces swung the final outcome in favour of the Israelis [12], [13].
The US further refined its technological capabilities during the late 1970s, developing the very capable F-4G Wild Weasel IV and EF-111A Raven, both of which set long term benchmarks for these respective capabilities. The rather simple AGM-45 Shrike anti-radiation missile was replaced by the sophisticated digital AGM-88 HARM [14].
The Soviet reaction to the IADS debacle in Vietnam, and the not entirely convincing performance during the Yom Kippur conflict, and the subsequent Syrian debacle in 1982, was to develop a new generation of SAMs and radars, with more range, better jam resistance, and importantly much better mobility [15].
These weapons were the S-300P / SA-10A Grumble semi-mobile strategic air defence missile, with its semi-mobile 5N63 Flap Lid engagement radar, modelled on the US MPQ-53 Patriot radar, and the sibling Soviet Army high mobility weapon, the S-300V / SA-12A/B Giant/Gladiator [16], [17].
By the early 1980s Soviet Voyska PVO units were receiving the self propelled S-300PS / SA-10B, soon followed by the digital S-300PM / SA-10C, a true analogue to the MIM-104 Patriot, but with better battery mobility. Concurrently, the medium range Army 2K12 / SA-6 was being replaced with the more capable 9M38 / SA-11 Gadfly [18].
The distinguishing features of this late Cold War generation of IADS systems were in very high mobility, all three of these systems being capable of firing five minutes after coming to a halt, and being capable of departing a location within 5 minutes of completing a missile engagement.  The S-300PS/PM and S-300V both employed high power, and for that period, exceptionally long ranging phased array engagement radars, much more difficult to jam than the engagement radars in the SA-2, SA-3 and SA-6 deployed and used during the 1960s and 1970s, and much more difficult to target with anti-radiation missiles. Importantly, the SA-10, SA-11 and SA-12 employed radio frequency datalinks, which allowed the battery command posts, engagement radars and missile launch vehicles considerable flexibility in how the battery was deployed geographically [19], [20].
When Saddam invaded Kuwait, the US possessed a robust conventional SEAD/DEAD capability in its fleets of HARM firing F-4G Wild Weasel and F/A-18 Hornet fighters, and a robust tactical jamming capability in the mixed fleet of EF-111A Ravens and EA-6B Prowlers. Less visible was the 37th Tactical Fighter Wing equipped with 60 F-117A Nighthawk stealth fighters.
The overwhelming and indeed crushing defeat of Saddam’s Soviet and French supplied IADS in 1991 was the result of a concentrated, coordinated and sustained effort using aerial decoys, SEAD/DEAD assets, jammers against IADS radars, and the F-117A against key hardened command posts [21], [22].
There are several key observations, which must be made about this campaign.
The first is that it was representative of the NATO vs. Warpac scenarios of that period – while the Soviets had good numbers of SA-10, SA-11 and some SA-12 deployed, these were mostly committed to protecting strategic targets inside Soviet territory, leaving much of the IADS capability in Central Europe to Warsaw Pact allies equipped with a mix of SA-2, SA-3, SA-4, SA-5 and SA-6 batteries. While these systems were better maintained, often of better subtypes, and more competently operated than Iraqi systems, they also had to cope with the full capabilities of NATO and the US, not just the forces deployed during Desert Shield.
The second observation is a corollary of the first, in that the new highly mobile SA-10, SA-11 and SA-12 were not deployed in Iraq. Indeed, Iraqi deployment doctrine of that period paid little attention to mobility, with SAM batteries nearly always fixed in location.
To achieve the intended effect against this legacy IADS, the US expended hundreds of drones, and importantly, around 2,000 AGM-88 HARM anti-radiation missiles, to which must be added the complete but smaller warstock of British ALARM anti-radiation missiles.
The Desert Storm campaign remains a key historical benchmark, but unfortunately it has also created quite unrealistic expectations of what can be achieved over the longer term.
The next significant air campaign was the 1999 Operation Allied Force effort against Serbia. While it has been considered a success due to the low aggregate loss rates of Coalition aircraft, the success of the SEAD/DEAD effort was much less convincing. While the Coalition did successfully destroy most of the static SA-2 and SA-3 batteries, they only managed to destroy 3 out of 25 mobile SA-6 batteries, or 12% percent of that total, despite the large number of HARMs launched. Disciplined “shoot and scoot” tactics by the Serbian defenders, intended to keep missile batteries alive, resulted in a persistent threat of sniping attacks which kept much of the NATO force of F-16CJs, EA-6Bs and Tornado ECRs occupied chasing SAM systems, largely to no avail. The Serbians did execute one particularly successful ambush, killing an F-117A stealth fighter using a legacy SA-3 missile battery [23].
The Allied force campaign happened a decade ago, since then there have been no significant air campaigns in which an IADS was employed to deny access to attacking aircraft.
What the Desert Storm and Allied Force campaigns did achieve was to provide both a focus and an imperative for further evolutionary growth in IADS capabilities, doctrine and technological strategy.
In the decade that has elapsed since Allied Force, we have seen a commercially and strategically driven flurry of developmental activity in the Russian and Chinese defence industries, reacting to the lessons of the 1990s, but also exploiting the globalised market for high technology, especially computer technology, commodified high performance microprocessor chips, and Gallium Arsenide microwave chips. Perhaps the only silver lining in this situation is that the global Internet provides Western observers with a much clearer picture of technological evolution in Russia, less so in China, than during the late Cold War and early 1990s [24].
We can now identify a number of key trends in IADS evolution, which are well established, and will define the basic features of well constructed near future air defences, such technology being globally marketed by Russia, former Soviet Republics, and China.

High Mobility:

All Russian SAM systems designed over the last decade can “shoot and scoot” in 5 minutes, with all key components self propelled, now mostly on all terrain wheeled vehicles with high road mobility. The most recently developed SAM system acquisition radars can redeploy inside 15 minutes. Chinese developed radars and SAM systems are following a similar pattern, with an increasing change to self-propelled designs [i].
A concurrent trend has been to market self-propelled mobility upgrades for legacy SA-2 and SA-3 systems, leaving only the legacy SA-5 as an inherently static system [25].

High Resistance to Jamming:

Most recent Russian engagement and acquisition radars are automatic pseudorandom frequency hoppers, many in fact “fast” frequency hoppers with pulse-to-pulse hopping capability. A similar trend is now being observed in Chinese radar designs. Such radars will exhibit similar jam resistance to Western frequency hopping technology used in radar and digital networks.
Importantly, frequency hopping technology is now appearing in upgrade packages for legacy radars, with at least one SNR-125 Low Blow upgrade including this capability [26], [27], [28], [29].

Phased Array Antenna Technology:

An increasing proportion of Russian engagement and now also acquisition radars are phased arrays, with at least two designs being active arrays with solid state transmitter modules (AESA). These provide agile beam steering, adaptive jammer nulling, adaptive allocation of transmit power, in addition to very low sidelobe emissions to frustrate emitter locating systems and anti-radiation missile seekers. All of the three recent Chinese engagement radars disclosed are phased arrays [30], [31], [32].
An important advantage in all phased arrays is they permit angle jam resistant high precision angle tracking by fast sequential lobbing, emulating monopulse techniques. They also permit high update rate angle and range tracking of multiple targets. This not only increases the potency of SAM engagement radars, but also blurs traditional distinctions between engagement radars and acquisition radars. If an outbound SAM is receiving midcourse trajectory updates produced by a VHF-band phased array “acquisition” radar networked with the SAM’s X-band “engagement” radar, both might as well be considered to be battery “engagement” radars.
The inevitable long-term trend is that Russian designers will move to active arrays (AESA) once manufacturing obstacles are overcome, resulting in further improved peak power performance.

Increasing Missile Range and Radar Power:

The trend in Russian missiles has been unequivocally toward increasing range, and concurrent increases in radar power-aperture product as a result. The improvements in missile range are partly due to more energetic solid propellants, but also due to “smart” trajectory control laws in the digital guidance systems employed. The longest ranging Russian SAMs, the 48N6E2/E3 and 40N6E, all fly ballistic trajectories against distant targets, achieving respectively ranges of 250 km and 400 km. Smart trajectory control in at least one digital upgrade to the SA-3 doubled its kinematic range [33], [34].
The increases in radar peak power required to support the increases in kinematic range provide useful counter-stealth capabilities, effectively neutralising stealth designs in the -20 dBSM performance class [35], [ii].

Lower Band Operating Frequencies:

The late Cold War preference for compact antennas and S-band operation has been supplanted by a preference for designs operating in the L-band and VHF-band. Of the six recent Russian acquisition radar designs, only one may operate in the S-band, the remainder being beyond any question L-band or VHF-band designs.
The preference for lower bands is intended to defeat stealth shaping and coatings optimised for S-band and X-band threats, but also electronic warfare self protection systems most of which cannot jam below the S-band due to antenna size limitations [36], [iii].

Pervasive Use of Digital COTS Processing:

The globalised market for computing hardware and open source software has seen all recent Russian radar and missile system designs built around COTS computing hardware and more that often open source software, especially the Linux operating system, and C/C++ programming language. This trend encompasses signal processing, track data processing, display graphical interface processing, networking, and command post processing [37], [38].
The availability of advanced yet commodity high performance computer hardware suitable for embedded applications has removed one of the single greatest technological advantages held by the Western world over the Soviets throughout the Cold War period.

Advanced Digital Signal and Data Processing:

The availability of COTS digital hardware and open source software has been a fundamental enabler for the introduction of a range of advanced processing algorithms and techniques until recently exclusive to Western radar designs.
Non Cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR) techniques based on target return fine structure are now appearing in Russian radar designs [39].
Space Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) techniques, which adaptively reject surface clutter and chaff, are also now appearing in Russian radar designs [40].
Track fusion algorithms, which are the basis of the US Navy Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) system, are now available in at least one Russian design, the Salyut Poima E [41].

Defensive Counter Measures and Emitting Decoys:

Radio frequency emitting decoys intended to seduce anti-radiation missiles are now being offered for most Russian radars, many of which include integration features to synchronise radar emissions with multiple decoys [42].
Inflatable visual decoys are on offer for some Russian equipment items, including the S-300PMU/S-400 series TELs.
At least one Russian radar is being offered with a comprehensive countermeasures suite, including a smoke generator to defeat laser and television guided smart weapons, a flare dispenser to defeat infrared and imaging infrared guided smart weapons, and a chaff dispenser intended to defeat millimetre wave (MMWI) band radar seeker guided weapons [43].
Russian GPS jamming equipment has been available for at least a decade in the global market.

Active Interception of Smart Weapons:

A trend which emerged during the nineties and has been reinforced by recent design optimisations in the Tor M2E / SA-15 and Pantsir S / SA-22 SAM systems, is the use of these short range point defence missile or missile / gun systems to shoot down smart munitions targeting SAM battery acquisition and engagement radars. The cited intent is to kill anti-radiation missiles, cruise missiles, or any other guided munitions being used by SEAD/DEAD aircraft against the missile battery [43], [44].
This is more than marketing, in that both the SA-15 and SA-22 have been re-equipped with agile beam phased array engagement radars designed to concurrently track many targets and engage same with missiles.

Alternative Missile Seekers:

Cold War era Soviet medium and long range SAMs employed primarily command link guidance and semi-active radar homing guidance, later supplemented by Track Via Missile guidance similar to that in the US MIM-104 Patriot. SAM designers did not espouse the philosophy of AAM designers, who would equip like missile airframes with alternative radar, infrared, and most recently, X-band anti-radiation homing seekers.
Since the end of the Cold War we have seen Serbia and Iraq experiment with the retrofit of infrared homing seekers to legacy Soviet SAM types. Agat in Russia have developed derivatives of their active radar AAM seekers for use in the SA-6/8/11/17 SAM rounds. China developed an anti-radiation seeker for use in their FT-2000 SAM, claimed to be a variant of the HQ-9.
The expectation that SAM rounds will be equipped only with a single seeker type belies the pressures to provide diversity in seeker types to overcome defensive jamming.

Pervasive Use of Digital Datalinks/Networks:

The Soviets were heavy users of digital datalinks and this propensity has expanded in more recent designs for SAM systems and supporting IADS elements, as commodified Gallium Arsenide chips have reduced the cost of development and production, and widely available software design tools have accelerated the development tempo.
Many contemporary equipment designs are designed around networks to provide wireless connectivity between self propelled components, and COTS networking to provide connectivity inside equipment.
Unlike the Western preoccupation with providing generalised “Metcalf-like” connectivity, Russian designers have been more disciplined and tend to use wireless connectivity for more specific functions.

Low Probability of Intercept Techniques:

Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) techniques involve the use of exceptional frequency agility, noise-like waveforms, and controlled emission patterns, to make the interception of radar or datalink transmissions exceptionally difficult.
To date there have been no significant open source disclosures on the use of these techniques in Russian datalinks or radars.
However, most if not all of the prerequisite technologies needed to implement LPI have been mastered by Russian industry. The assumption that LPI will not be introduced and employed in IADS components is simply not supportable even in the near term [iv].

Integration of Emitter Locating Systems with SAM Batteries:

A feature long expected and recently announced as part of the S-400/SA-21 SAM system is the provision of interfaces to permit the battery to accept targeting track data from 85V6 and 1L222 series mobile passive emitter locating systems [45], [46], [47].
Such emitter locating systems have proven very effective at three-dimensional tracking of aircraft, using their JTIDS/Link-16 network terminal, IFF, or TACAN emissions. Emitting ISR platforms are especially vulnerable to tracking by such systems.
If used in concert with a SAM system engagement radar, where the radar will “tease” emissions from defensive jammers in an aircraft to facilitate tracking, the emitter locating system may effectively nullify the benefit of having a jammer.
Most recent Russian radar designs include capabilities for angle tracking of opposing jammers.

Hybridisation of SAM Systems:

Hybridisation of SAM systems, where legacy missiles and launchers are  supported by newer technology engagement radars, has a well established history in the Soviet IADS environment, but mostly in the provision of “backward compatibility” in evolving families of weapons. The two best examples are the SA-6 and SA-11 family of weapons, where transitional subtypes could control Fire Dome engagement radars on TELARs, and the SA-10/20 family of weapons, where later 30N6 Tomb Stone radars can guide SA-10 5V55 series missile rounds.
A more recent trend has been the hybridisation of dissimilar systems, where a modern agile beam phased array engagement radar gains the capability to guide legacy missiles associated with an entirely different SAM system design. The best example is the SA-20/21 family of systems acquiring the ability to control the SA-5 Square Pair illuminator radar, and emerging evidence of likely Chinese integration of the legacy SA-2/HQ-2 missiles with the new H-200 phased array engagement radar developed for the new HQ-12/KS-1A SAM [48].
Hybridisation is especially concerning for two reasons. The first is that it completely obsoletes all extant electronic warfare techniques and equipment developed against the legacy radar – and it may be difficult to determine its presence a priori. The second is that a new phased array radar will expand the lethality of the system providing many capabilities absent in the legacy radar.
What is abundantly clear at the close of the first decade of the 21st century is that almost two decades after the fall of the Soviet regime, the former Soviet defence industry has remade itself and successfully assimilated much of the digital and microwave technology base available in the global market.
With the exception of a handful of technologies, such as advanced low observables, high density chip design, and X-band active phased array (AESA) modules, Russian industry has closed the gap in most key areas of IADS related technology.
This should be neither surprising nor unexpected, but given repeated statements, and related policy decisions, by numerous senior Western DoD bureaucrats in recent times, it is evident that this “new reality” is either not understood, or there is complete indifference to its existence.
To appreciate the specific impacts produced by evolving IADS technologies and doctrine, it is well worth testing the primary Western tools used to defeat IADS, against the new reality.


Effectiveness of Established Technology vs. Modern IADS




The US and its Allies have relied in recent decades upon a small number of pivotal technologies and techniques to defeat IADS and gain access to hostile airspace.
These include precision emitter locating systems, the anti-radiation missile, guided bombs and cruise missiles, Electronic Warfare Self Protection equipment carried by penetrating aircraft, high power support jamming aircraft, and most importantly, stealth. To a greater or lesser extent, all of these technologies are now being challenged.

Precision Emitter Locating Systems:

Modern Russian doctrine is to directly attack airborne ISR assets using very long range SAMs and AAMs [49].
Where the ISR system is not so threatened, it will have to contend with low sidelobe antennas and smart/agile scan patterns, the by-product of a move to phased array designs. Further challenges will arise from a well proven doctrine of carefully controlling emissions, using passive sensors, and the exploitation of the high mobility of modern IADS components [50].
The conclusion is that future IADS elements will be much more difficult to locate and track. Penetrating ISR assets with high stealth performance will be required.

Anti Radiation Missiles:

The defeat of Anti-Radiation Missiles (ARM) has absorbed considerable intellectual effort in Russia, which is now yielding dividends.
An ARM will have to overcome synchronised, smart emitting decoys, which are likely to employ extant Russian DRFM (Digital RF Memory) technology and thus be extremely difficult to distinguish from the target emitter. In addition, emitters will generate low side and backlobes and may exploit agile electronic beam steering to evade interception. The pervasive use of self-propelled radars will exacerbate the problems observed in the OAF campaign of 1999.
If the ARM can overcome these impediments, it has to survive interception by short range weapons tasked with interception of the ARM.
Unless the ARM is hypersonic, or exceptionally stealthy, or both, it is likely to fall victim to the terminal defences deployed in the IADS.
While recent developments such as ramjet propulsion to improve kinematics, and multimode seekers to attack non-emitting targets, will improve anti-radiation missile effectiveness against high mobility threats, they cannot address the active use of countermeasures against the missile seeker, and the use of defensive fire against the missile itself.

Guided Bombs and Cruise Missiles:

Guided bombs have been used increasingly for the DEAD role. Like ARMs, they will have to contend with countermeasures and decoys, and jamming of the GPS carrier signals. They will also have to survive terminal short-range missile and gun defences.
 A consideration for glide weapons like the JSOW, winged JDAM and SDB, as well as cruise missiles, is that self-propelled IADS components may no longer be at the DMPI when the weapon arrives.
Time of flight is therefore an issue in its own right and for standoff attacks with cruise missiles such as the Tomahawk, CALCM and JASSM, the basic operating cycle of a mobile battery may be enough to defeat the weapon. While datalinks offer potential for retargeting a cruise missile in flight, they increase the vulnerability of the weapon, and will be jammed by the defending side, while the availability of penetrating ISR capability to support such retargeting remains problematic.
Stealthy cruise missiles such as the JASSM/JASSM-ER offer the best potential for surviving enroute to the target, but their endgame survivability in the last three miles of flight remains questionable, given existing and emerging capabilities in “counter-PGM” optimised point defence weapons. Eight SDBs targeting a single aimpoint are more likely to be successful than one or two cruise missiles, simply due to the saturation of the missile batteries involved.
Weapons with terminal seekers will have to overcome countermeasures deployed by a target system, if the weapon can arrive before the target has redeployed itself, and is not shot down as it approaches the target.

Electronic Warfare Self Protection and Support Jamming: 

EWSP equipment has been critical to the survivability of Western combat aircraft subjected to SAM attacks. The advent of DRFM based jammers during the 1990s provided much greater potency compared to earlier analogue jammers.
In a modern IADS environment jamming will have to overcome robust Electronic Counter Counter Measures (ECCM/EPM) capabilities in radars and SAM seekers. Russian design philosophy stresses countermeasures resistance, and modern designs employ monopulse angle tracking techniques, frequency hopping, jammer nulling and other techniques. The advent of track fusion techniques will further enhance jam resistance.
No less importantly, most modern Russian radars employ jammer angle tracking techniques, which combined with pervasive networking, will provide missile batteries with an organic capability to target SAMs against jamming aircraft. The potential for alternate SAM seeker types increases this risk.
The integration of passive Emitter Locating Systems into SAM batteries provides at a minimum an ability to overcome jamming, and at worst an organic targeting capability exploiting emissions from the jammer.
Support jamming aircraft have been a priority target since the Soviet era, and the S-300V/SA-12 system had specific angle tracking capabilities designed in for this very purpose during the 1980s. Current Russian thinking is to employ very long range SAMs to kill support jamming aircraft in their standoff orbits. By extending SAM kinematic range past 120 nautical miles, the Russians have driven aircraft using the extant ALQ-99 Tactical Jamming System (EA-6B/EA-18G) outside of the power-aperture envelope where this system performs most effectively [51], [52], [53].
The Next Generation Jammer, if at all implemented, will need to be designed around the realities of long range missile attacks against standoff jamming aircraft.

Very Low Observable Performance (Stealth):

Stealth remains the ace in the US deck of cards for defeating modern IADS. Unfortunately a belief has developed in parts of the US defence community that “any stealth is good enough”, as evidenced by the ongoing debate surrounding the viability of the Joint Strike Fighter. Unfortunately what might have been true in the world of the 1980s is not true today, as Western aircraft must confront much more powerful and longer ranging radar technology.
Analysis of available performance data for a wide range of modern Russian and Chinese acquisition and engagement radars indicates that at a minimum to survive in a modern IADS a combat aircraft will require an “all aspect” Radar Cross Section in the -35 dBSM to -45 dBSM class, from the L-band through to the Ku-band [54].
Such performance is demonstrably delivered by only two existing designs, the B-2A Spirit and the F-22A Raptor. The X-47B UCAS and planned New Generation Bomber (“QDR Bomber” or “2018 Bomber”) will, if well designed, fall comfortably within this performance envelope.
The Joint Strike Fighter is not in this class and without a deep, time consuming and very expensive redesign, cannot be [55].
This should not be surprising as it is a design built to earn export dollars rather than deliver credible and survivable capabilities in the long term. Benefits for the US and other industrial complexes, ahead of capability, may well be politically attractive, but have no place in a world where potential threats have been allowed to outweigh, and increasingly so, the deterrent capabilities meant to keep the world in balance.

In summary, of the suite of technologies currently employed by the US for the penetration and defeat of IADS, only the upper tier of US stealth aircraft will be effective and remain effective against current and emerging modern IADS.



The B-2A Spirit is the only operational type in the US inventory, other than the F-22, which can survive in a modern IADS. Only twenty were built due to the post Cold War budgetary collapse.



Strategic Impact of IADS Evolution




The United States and its Allies have relied since the end of the Cold War upon the ability to quickly overwhelm an opposing IADS, and the ability to then deliver massed precision firepower from the air, as the weapon of choice in resolving nation state conflicts.
The reality of evolving IADS technology and its global proliferation is that most of the US Air Force combat aircraft fleet, and all of the US Navy combat aircraft fleet, will be largely impotent against an IADS constructed from the technology available today from Russian and, increasingly so, Chinese manufacturers. If flown against such an IADS, US legacy fighters from the F-15 through to the current production F/A-18E/F would suffer prohibitive combat losses attempting to penetrate, suppress or destroy such an IADS.
The IADS technology in question is currently being deployed by China, Iran, Venezuela, and other nations, most of which have poor relationships with the Western alliance.
Until the US Air Force deploys significant numbers of the intended New Generation Bomber post 2020, only aircraft types in the US arsenal will be capable of penetrating, suppressing and destroying such an IADS – the B-2A Spirit and the F-22A Raptor.
Cruise missile bombardment from standoff ranges is often presented as an alternative to crewed combat aircraft delivering precision bombs. The difficulty, identified earlier, with cruise missile bombardment is that it is most effective against fixed targets, and improving point defence capabilities present a genuine risk that a sizeable proportion of cruise missiles sortied will be shot down as they close on their targets. Another consideration is the aggregate cost of such bombardment, since cruise missiles are still at least an order of magnitude more expensive than guided bombs, making the sustained delivery of thousands of rounds difficult to sustain by production, and fiscally [56].
Stealthy Uninhabited Combat Aerial Systems (UCAS/UCAV) have also been proposed, specifically for SEAD/DEAD and fixed target strike operations. This technology presents as a better choice than cruise missiles, for economic reasons and the potential for a UCAV to saturate terminal defences with multiple SDBs. While a credible airframe with adequate stealth performance is feasible in the near term, the X-47B presenting as a good example, the remaining components required for a credible capability remain immature, risky and in many respects, problematic. The required range and loiter endurance will require an aerial refuelling capability for the uncrewed system. Satellite downlinks from the vehicle, and line of sight datalinks, will be jammed by an opponent, forcing heavy reliance on autonomous onboard artificial intelligence, and organic ISR capabilities on the vehicle itself, if anything beyond fixed infrastructure targets are to be attacked [57].
The only low risk technological strategy available to the US in the 2010 – 2020 timeframe is exploitation of existing stealth technology designs, which are as noted earlier, only the F-22A Raptor and B-2A Spirit [58], [59], [v].
There are only twenty B-2As in existence and retooling to manufacture a B-2C is an expensive approach given the commitment to the New Generation Bomber [60].
The United States therefore has only one remaining strategic choice at this time. That strategic choice is to manufacture a sufficient number of F-22A Raptors to provide a credible capability to conduct a substantial air campaign using only the B-2A and F-22A fleets.
The expectation that the US can get by with a small “golden bullet” fleet of stealth aircraft to carve holes in IADS to permit legacy aircraft to attack is no longer credible. The difficulty in locating and killing the new generation of self propelled and highly survivable IADS radars and launchers presents the prospect of a replay of the 1999 OAF campaign, with highly lethal SAM systems waiting in ambush, and mostly evading SEAD/DEAD attacks.
The F-22A Raptor will therefore have to perform the full spectrum of penetrating roles, starting with counter-air, and encompassing SEAD/DEAD, penetrating ISR and precision strike against strategic and tactical targets. The B-2A fleet can robustly bolster capabilities, but the small number of these superb aircraft available will result inevitably in very selective use.
How many F-22A Raptors is enough to meet this capability benchmark? If we assume an aircraft configuration reflecting the planned F-22A Block 40 configuration, and we assume a contingency of similar magnitude to Desert Storm, then the required number of F-22A aircraft to cover the spectrum of penetrating roles is of the order of 500 to 600 aircraft [61], [62].
This is making assumptions such that few F-22A aircraft will need to be retained for other duties in other theatres, and that a significant air threat does not exist and thus few F-22A aircraft need to be committed to Defensive Counter Air operations.
From a different perspective, a block replacement of the ~600 strong F-15A-E Eagle / Strike Eagle fleet one for one with F-22A Raptors would provide the proper fleet size.
The United States no longer has any real choices in this matter, if it wishes to retain its secure global strategic position in the 2010 – 2020 time window. Any other force structure model will result in a nett loss of strategic potential, and produce strategic risks, which neither the US nor its Allies can afford.

(U.S. Air Force photo)


Endnotes:



[i] There are some indications that the Russians intend to wholly standardise on wheeled vehicles for all of their IADS components. This makes sense insofar as wheeled vehicles are more affordable to buy and maintain,  provide higher road speed than tracked equivalents, and produce a less challenging vibration environment for electronic equipment. The Cold War imperative to provide organic air defence for tank armies operating off road has vanished, while the imperative of mobility has increased.


[ii] An argument which sometimes energes in the radar observables engineering community is that power aperture alone is not enough to detect and track targets with an RCS below -20 dBSM, due to impairments such as receiver channel noise floor, master oscillator coherency and phase noise, and limitations in receiver analogue/digital converter linearity, and quantisation performance / dynamic range. While these impairments may well compromise detection performance against very low signature targets, these impairments are also readily reduced by block upgrades to key radar components, block upgrades which are typically much cheaper than transmitter design changes to increase power-aperture performance.  Power-aperture performance thus sets the outer bound on the performance of the radar in question, and it is strategically unsafe to assume that over the operational life of such a radar receiver and oscillator upgrades will not be inserted to drive actual detection performance to this physics constrained bound.

[iii] A wider consideration here is that most Western threat warning receivers and aircraft self protection systems do not have coverage extending into the L-band, indeed many systems cut off at around 2 GHz. Much the same is true of anti-radiation missiles. The technological problem is that of the antenna dimensions required to produce useful gain.

[iv] The PLA is known to have experimented with LPI techniques for at least 25 years. They have employed Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) modulations, Frequency Modulated Interrupted Continuous Wave (FMICW) modulations, forms of Pulse Code Modulation, and pseudonoise modulations. The author is indebted to John Wise for his advice in this area. 

[v] The B-2A has the radar low observables performance to defeat all of the threat radars in question. However if unescorted it will be limited to night only operations, due to the risk of hostile fighters and weapons with electro-optical guidance regimes, under clear sky conditions. With an adequate number of F-22s available, such that OCA/DCA/SEAD/DEAD escorts can be attached to the B-2A, the aircraft can then be safely flown day or night. Subject to basing distances and turnaround times, this could double the sortie rates achievable by the limited number of B-2As in service.

avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Dom Feb 19, 2017 9:03 pm

Otro interesante análisis(en inglés),sobre la efectividad de los actuales sistemas antiaéreos 

http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-SAM-Effectiveness.html

Surface to Air Missile Effectiveness in Past Conflicts

Technical Report APA-TR-2010-1001

Dr Carlo Kopp, AFAIAA, SMIEEE, PEng
  
October, 2010
Updated April, 2012
  
Text © 2010 - 2012 Carlo Kopp
Extended paper, first published Defence Today, Vol.8, No.2 03/2010
Surface to Air Missile Effectiveness in Past Conflicts

Technical Report APA-TR-2010-1001

Dr Carlo Kopp, AFAIAA, SMIEEE, PEng
  
October, 2010
Updated April, 2012
  
Text © 2010 - 2012 Carlo Kopp
Extended paper, first published Defence Today, Vol.8, No.2 03/2010





Modern SAMs like this Chinese HQ-9 system have none of the vulnerabilities of the SAMs defeated in the Middle East, and employ highly automated digital fire control systems and radars. (image Chinese internet).






Background




There are major disparities in the recorded combat effectiveness of Soviet supplied Surface to Air Missile (SAM) systems, used in past decades, across theatres of operation. Most interesting is how poorly these SAM systems performed in the Middle East, compared to their combat effect in South East Asia. 

The relevance of this arguably obscure historical detail, is that contemporary perceptions of the effectiveness of the latest generation of Russian and Chinese built SAM systems are more than often, in Western defence bureaucracies, determined on the basis of views such as “We trashed Russian SAMs completely in 1991, so why should we care about the effectiveness of current SAM systems?”.

The latter argument has been put to this author more than once in recent times, by parties in Australia and overseas, so the perception that the effectiveness of state of the art new technology SAMs is no different to that of 1960s and 1970s technology SAMs operated in Middle East nearly two decades ago is widely held, and often fervently believed.

The material reality is that newer generation SAM systems such as the S-300PMU1, S-300PMU2 Favorit (SA-20), HQ-9/FD-2000/FT-2000 and S-400 Triumf  (SA-21) are in terms of basic technology and performance very close to, if not better than the US MIM-104 Patriot series, and importantly, have never been challenged in combat by Western air forces, these including the formidable Israeli Air Force.

The volume of detailed technical material now available from open sources on Soviet era SAM systems, specifically the SA-2 Guideline (S/SA-75 Volkhov/Dvina), SA-3 Goa (S-125 Neva/Pechora), SA-5 Gammon (S-200 Vega) and SA-6 Gainful (2K12 Kub/Kvadrat) is staggering, by Cold War era standards, and permits a much more focused and deeper analysis of the operational issues than was even possible using then limited classified source materials, during the Cold War period. 


Soviet SAM Operations - SEA Versus MidEast Theatres




In South East Asia, the Soviet S-75/SA-2 Guideline was used exclusively, with batteries deployed widely across North Vietnam from the mid 1960s. Sources vary widely on numbers, but a common figure is 50 batteries rotating between 150 fixed SAM sites. Figures on the number of SAMs fired per kill also vary, with declassified data suggesting dozens of rounds per kill, increasing over time as the US improved its defence suppression technique and technology.

The 
Soviet S-75/SA-2 Guideline was designed primarily as a “strategic SAM”, intended to provide area defence of fixed target areas against attacking aircraft at medium to high altitudes. The command link guided weapon had a variable thrust liquid propellant rocket sustainer motor, and was supported typically by an X-band RSNA-75 Fan Song engagement radar, and a P-12 Spoon Rest 2D VHF-Band acquisition radar. Nominal redeployment time for a battery was several hours, dependent in part on battery crew proficiency, and in part on terrain, as a large convoy of vehicles was required for movements.

Perhaps most contentious matter in this discussion is what constitutes the best “measure of effectiveness” for assessing the PAVN SAM force. Over North Vietnam (NVN), most losses were statistically produced by PAVN Anti-Aircraft Artillery (AAA) batteries, in fact total US Air Force losses of 740 F/RF-4, F-105 and F-100 tactical fighters between 1964 and 1973 can mostly be credited to AAA in NVN and Laos. Declassified US statistics show a good fraction of the these losses resulted from low altitude attacks on SAM sites, and most others from low altitude attacks on other targets in an attempt to stay below the medium to high altitude engagement envelope of the SA-2. While direct losses to SAM firings appear modest, the percentage of kills to SAMs was as high as 31.5% for F-4 in 1971-73, and 17 B-52s were lost, mostly to SAMs.

Usually supported by experienced Soviet or Warsaw Pact instructors, the PAVN operated the SA-2 to best effect, exploited its limited mobility fully, and used the SA-2 to bait “flak traps”, as well as to drive US aircraft into the envelope of dense AAA fire. In addition, the  large and ongoing effort to suppress or destroy SAM systems absorbed a large proportion of sorties flown into NVN.

The simple metric of counting direct losses to enemy weapon types is not a particularly good 
“measure of effectiveness” for assessing the effect and impact of air defence weapon types in a mixed threat environment. With no SAMs deployed in a theatre, the effectiveness of visually aimed and radar directed AAA is poor, as aircraft can attack unhindered from medium and high altitudes, out of the useful envelope of barrelled weapons. By the same token, in a SAM rich environment where AAA would be absent, aircraft can attack unhindered from low altitudes, exploiting terrain masking and performance limitations in SAMs and their supporting radar systems. 

In NVN operations, the PAVN followed period Soviet doctrine very closely, and that doctrine dictated the use of mutually supporting and overlapping air defence weapons through the whole altitude envelope. The effect is synergistic, in the sense that no portion of the altitude envelope then presents a low penetration risk for the attacker.

When assessing the combat effectiveness of SAMs, on a per system basis, a much better measure is the number of kills produced per round fired, per engagement. The difficulty in producing hard analysis is that without hard data on rounds expended, this measure is difficult to produce with any accuracy. While raw statistics on losses to AAA would appear to favour AAA over SAMs in SEA operations, what proportion of the aircraft sorties flown would have entered the AAA engagement envelope had SAMs been absent, and what number of AAA systems was deployed at what personnel and expended munitions cost, in comparison with PAVN SAM battery numbers?

There are two illustrative examples from the NVN air campaigns, both falling into the latter period of the conflict.

The first is the use of the F-111A during the  1972 Linebacker I/II campaigns. Flying at very low altitudes using automatic terrain following radar, the aircraft defeated both radar directed AAA and SAMs, and incurred statistically per sortie the lowest loss rates in these campaigns.

The highest per type loss rate during Linebacker II was incurred by the B-52 fleet, exclusively to S-75/SA-2 SAM shots, despite the heavy use of onboard EW, support jamming aircraft, defence suppression aircraft, chaff bombers and fighter escorts. Had SAMs been absent from the theatre, it is unlikely any B-52s would have been lost.

The statistical loss rate of 15 x B-52D/G across 729 flown sorties is around 2 percent, the limit for sustainable losses in an attrition strategy campaign, despite the concerted defence suppression effort directed against the PAVN SAM force. Importantly, once the PAVN expended most of its warstock of S-75/SA-2 SAM rounds, no further B-52s were lost.

A factor frequently ignored in lay analyses of such campaigns is the fraction of total effort expended in providing defence suppression support for penetrating aircraft. A large proportion of tactical aircraft sorties flown during Linebacker II, including much of the F-111 effort, was directed against PAVN S-75/SA-2 SAM sites. Effort expended and losses  so incurred are directly correlated with SAM deployment.

Any objective analysis of the combat effect of SAMs in SEA operations must therefore consider not only losses directly attributable to SAM hits or SAM combat damage, but also effort expended and losses to all other causes arising from operational measures taken to suppress or evade SAM batteries. From this perspective, Soviet SAMs were the single most effective component of the PAVN IADS.



Above, proximity fused SA-2 round explodes beneath a US Air Force RF-4C Phantom flown by Capts. Edwin Atterberry and Thomas Parrott near Hanoi, 12th August, 1967. Below, the RF-4C breaks up as a result of fatal structural damage. Both crew survived the ejection, but Capt Atterberry was later killed in captivity by the PAVN (US Air Force images).



A damaged F-105D after a near miss by a proximity fused SA-2 round (US Air Force image).


US Air Force F-105D Thunderchief evading an SA-2 missile over North Vietnam (US Air Force image).




SA-2 missile in flight over the NVAF airfield at Kep (US Air Force image).



An operational S-75 / SA-2 SAM site photographed from low altitude by a US reconnaissance aircraft early during the Vietnam conflict. Note the large number of radar and generator vans, reduced in later variants of the system (US Air Force).
Data from Middle Eastern conflicts, other than Desert Storm, is far more fragmentary, and more than often contaminated by a reluctance on the part of the Israelis, Egyptians and Syrians to fully disclose combat losses. There have been ongoing public arguments  ever since over who killed what when” .

Major clashes involving the use of Soviet SAMs were the War of Attrition between Israel and Egypt, the 1973 Yom Kippur war, and the 1982 invasion of Lebanon.

The first Soviet SAMs in the region were 15 to 25 SA-2 batteries delivered during the late 1960s, but were not particularly effective. They were crewed by Egyptians with Soviet instructors, and some were captured in the Sinai advance of 1967. Syria during this period deployed the SA-2 and fielded 18 batteries, later supplemented by 16 SA-3 batteries.

In early 1970, the Soviets initiated Operation Caucasus, and deployed an overstrength division of Soviet PVO air defence troops, comprising 18 battalions in three brigades, led by General Smirnov of the PVO, and drawn from PVO units in the Dnepropetrovsk, Moscow, Leningrad and Belarus districts. Each battalion comprised four SA-3 batteries, a platoon of ZSU-23-4 SPAAGs and supporting SA-7 MANPADS teams. While these units were ostensibly “instructors”, they were dressed in Egyptian uniforms and provided full crewing for the deployed SAM systems. Through early 1970 the PVO units were deployed along the Suez Canal. Operational doctrine was similar to NVN, with batteries relocating frequently, and setting up ambushes for Israeli aircraft, using multiple mutually supporting batteries.

The Soviet S-125/SA-3 Goa was designed primarily to provide point defence of fixed target areas against attacking aircraft at low to medium altitudes. The command link guided weapon had a fixed thrust solid propellant rocket sustainer motor, and was supported typically by an X-band SNR-125 engagement radar, and a P-15 Flat Face UHF-Band acquisition radar, with respectable low altitude clutter rejection performance. Nominal redeployment time for a battery was several hours, not unlike the S-75/SA-2, dependent in part on battery crew proficiency, and in part on terrain, as a large convoy of vehicles was required for movements.

In subsequent engagements against the Israelis, the Soviets are claimed to have shot down five Israeli aircraft using the SA-3, making for a cumulative total of 22 lost to SA-2, SA-3 and AAA during this period.

The Egyptians sought to retake their 1967 losses in 1973, and to support that campaign procured three brigades of SA-6 Gainful, comprising 18 batteries. Unlike Soviet batteries using the shoot and scoot 1S12 Long Track radar, Egyptian SA-6 batteries mostly used the semi-mobile P-15 Flat Face and P-15M Squat Eye UHF radars. Syria is claimed to have procured two brigades.

When the Egyptians crossed the Suez Canal, and the Syrians stormed the Golan Heights, their ground forces and strategic targets were protected by SAM and AAA units. It is widely acknowledged that the Israelis suffered heavy losses of aircraft during the fighting in 1973. Exactly how many were lost to SAMs, and to which type of SAM, has been less well documented. Israeli public claims are that 303 aircraft were lost in combat, and other sources identify 40 of these as lost to SAMs, and between 4 and 12 to Arab fighters. This puts most Israeli losses as a result of low altitude AAA fire, and emulates the pattern observed in SEA – SAMs denying the use of high and medium altitude airspace, driving aircraft down into the envelope of high density AAA.

The Soviets were cast out of Egypt in early 1976, followed by Sadat’s peace treaty with Israel and Egypt’s realignment away from conflict with the West. Chinese and Western contractors took over support of the Soviet SAM systems.

The next major conflict to see SAMs used in anger was the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982, named “Operation Peace for Galilee”, and intended to drive the PLO out of Lebanon. This well thought out and planned campaign was an absolute rout of the Syrian SAM belt installed in the Bekaa Valley of Lebanon. The first attack of the 9th June, 1982, saw 17 of the 19 Syrian SAM batteries annihilated, the Israelis using airborne standoff jammers extensively, and supported by emitter locating systems, also fired large numbers of AGM-45 Shrike and AGM-78 Standard anti-radiation missiles, in addition to domestically modified Shrikes with rocket boosters, launched from trucks like Katyusha rockets. Crippled and defenceless SAM batteries were then annihilated with free fall bombs.

The Soviet doctrine of ambush attacks, SAM system mobility, clever use of emission control and decoys, camouflage of SAM sites, and the use of supporting electronic warfare assets was abandoned by the Syrians completely. Hurley’s summary of Syrian behaviour in the Winter 1989 issue of Air Power Journal is perhaps the best summary: 

“Syrian SAM operators also invited disaster upon themselves. Their Soviet equipment was generally regarded as quite good; Syrian handling of it was appalling. 

As noted by Lt Gen Leonard Perroots, director of the US Defense Intelligence Agency, 
The Syrians used mobile missiles in a fixed configuration; they put the radars in the valley instead of the hills because they didn't want to dig latrines -- seriously. The Syrian practice of stationing mobile missiles in one place for several months allowed Israeli reconnaissance to determine the exact location of the missiles and their radars, giving the IAF a definite tactical advantage on the eve of battle. Even so, the Syrians might have been able to avoid the complete destruction of their SAM complex had they effectively camouflaged their sites; instead, they used smoke to “hide” them, which actually made them easier to spot from the air. It is ironic that the Syrians, who have been criticized for their strict adherence to Soviet doctrine, chose to ignore the viable doctrine that emphasizes the utility of maneuver and camouflage. According to a 1981 article in Soviet Military Review, alternate firing positions, defensive ambushes, regular repositioning of mobile SAMs to confuse enemy intelligence, and the emplacement of dummy SAM sites are fundamental considerations for the effective deployment and survivability of ground-based air defenses.”

The 1982 Bekaa Valley debacle was repeated on a much larger scale in January, 1991, when US led Coalition air forces annihilated Saddam’s SAM defences, the decisive blows inflicted in the first few hours. While that campaign is well documented in detail elsewhere, like the 1982 campaign, large scale use was made of anti-radiation missiles, support jamming, and precision weapons. The deployment pattern of Saddam’s forces also differed little, with few batteries attempting to exploit any inherent mobility in their systems, and often undisciplined emissions permitting easy location, targeting and attack. The composition of Saddam’s SAM force comprised much the same SA-2, SA-3, SA-6, SA-8 and SA-9 SAM systems, supplemented by some modern French supplied Thales Roland SAMs and Tiger series radars.



Aerial reconnaissance image of a Middle Eastern S-125 / SA-3 Goa site (via http://peters-ada.de/).

The common thread running through the latter Middle Eastern SAM vs air power campaigns is very clear – the use of ageing and often obsolescent SAM and radar technology and the abandonment of the by then mature Soviet doctrine of SAM system mobility, concealment, deception and mutual support. Most of the fire control and search radars used were by then fully compromised to the West, and highly effective electronic countermeasures were available.

There is another consideration, which is difficult to establish through published sources, which is that of the education, training, proficiency and competencies of the SAM battery crews operating Syrian and Iraqi systems during this period.

Study of the plethora of detailed technical materials now available on Soviet SA-2, SA-3, SA-5, SA-6 and SA-8 SAM systems, and discussions with former Warsaw Pact missileers, indicate that the full effectiveness and performance potential of these first and second generation Soviet SAMs required crews which were highly intelligent, with a good technical education, and both very highly trained and proficient. Tight teamwork in the missile control van was essential, as the crew had to integrate and interpret outputs from multiple sensors, using often rudimentary analogue displays. Critical tasks such as initial target acquisition, and target tracking, were more than often performed manually, with the operator having to concurrently interpret more than one display output, in real time. Limited electronic counter-counter measures were available, requiring a smart operator to interpret and understand the type of hostile jamming, to manually select alternate frequencies and modes.

This was paralleled by challenging demands for technical personnel, especially in the setup and tear down of SA-2 and SA-3 batteries, which a highly proficient crew could relocate in about six hours. Launchers and vans had to be deployed, everything connected by cable harnesses, antennas needed alignment, and the whole system had to be tested before it could go online. While the SA-6 and SA-8 were designed for shoot and scoot mobility, maintenance of their complex systems was no less challenging, requiring vanloads of test equipment. Training for all of these systems required a van full of equipment to provide simulation inputs for the SAM control system.

The failure of Syrian and Iraqi missileers to follow Soviet operational doctrine, tactics and deployment technique indicates that the root cause of poor effectiveness in combat was deeply deficient training of missileers, and prima facie, also support personnel. The effectiveness of the very same SAM systems, operated by Soviet, Warsaw Pact and PAVN personnel, was vastly better, whether in the Middle East or South East Asia.

The 1999 bombing of Serbia is the case study, which closes this loop. While Serbian SA-2, SA-3 and SA-6 batteries were largely ineffective due to the use of standoff jamming, anti-radiation missiles and stealth, they also proved vastly more difficult to kill due to smart use of mobility, camouflage and emission control. A single SA-3 battery, commanded by then LtCol Zoltan Dani, downed an F-117A and an F-16C, and damaged another F-117A. Prior to the conflict, Dani worked his crew for weeks in the simulator, driving up proficiency and crew teamwork. During the conflict, he relocated his battery as frequently as possible, and exercised strict emission control. His battery survived and inflicted the single most embarrassing combat loss the US has suffered for decades. Serbian SA-6 crews, following the same hide, shoot and scoot doctrine, mostly survived the war. The Serbian SAMs and radars were largely of the same vintage and subtypes, as those used by the Iraqis and Syrians. The fact that NATO forces were unable to quickly kill off the Serbian SAM batteries forced continuing and ongoing sorties by NATO support jamming and defence suppression aircraft, driving up the cost to drop each bomb delivered several-fold. NATO forces launched 743 AGM-88 HARM anti-radiation missile rounds for very little damage effect – around one third of the number used to cripple Iraq’s much larger air defence system in 1991. 

If we compare Desert Storm to Allied Force, the SAM systems were largely the same, but NATO had better electronic warfare systems, many more Emitter Locating Systems, and an abundance of newer smart munitions, including newer and better anti-radiation missiles. The fundamental difference was in the personnel operating the SAM systems – better educated, better trained, and highly motivated.


SNR-125M1T Low Blow UNV radar head, UNK operator van and 5P73 launcher with four 5V27D Goa rounds loaded, all components of a Serbian SAM battery responsible for killing a US F-117A Nighthawk and F-16C (images  © 2009, Miroslav Gyűrösi). 




Fully deployed 72V6 (SA-22) SPAAGM prototype on BAZ-6909 chassis. This variant incorporates a new VNIIRT designed 1RS2-1E agile beam phased array engagement radar. The primary design aim for this system was the interception of PGMs, especially the AGM-88 HARM/AARGM and GBUs (Sergei Kuznetsov via Strizhi.ru).



Chinese LD-2000 demonstrator during trials, this 30 mm Gatling gun SPAAG was derived from a naval CIWS point defence system developed to kill anti-ship cruise missiles. The stated role of this SPAAG now includes the defeat of munitions in flight.


Conclusions



The study of SAM effectiveness in air campaigns between the 1960s and the last decade may span a period of almost a half century, but in every one of these campaigns the numerically dominant SAM systems were Soviet designs which were developed during the 1950s and 1960s, specifically the S-75 / SA-2 Guideline, the S-125 / SA-3 Goa and the 2K12 / SA-6 Gainful, with sporadic use of the S-200VE / SA-5 Gammon and 9K33 / SA-8 Gecko.

In comparison with SAM systems currently available on the global market, offered by Russian and Chinese manufacturers, these legacy SAM systems are inferior in many respects:


  1. Modern SAM engagement and acquisition radars are designed from the outset to be highly resistant to jamming, and typically deliver higher peak power-aperture performance to engage lower signature targets;
  2. Some modern SAM engagement radars are claimed to provide a basic LPI (Low Probability of Intercept) capability, making their detection and tracking difficult;
  3. Nearly all modern SAM systems and supporting radars are highly mobile, engineered from the outset for “hide, shoot and scoot” operations;
  4. Modern SAMs are all kinematically superior to their Cold War era predecessors, by virtue of better rocket motor technology, and digital guidance, yielding greater engagement ranges and terminal endgame manoeuvre performance.

Contemporary SAM systems in these categories include the Russian SA-20 (S-300PMU1, S-300PMU2), Chinese HQ-9/FD-2000 and Russian SA-21 (S-400). These are modern systems with highly jam resistant radars, and if the Chinese are correct, basic low probability of intercept capability. 

These systems will be difficult to locate, jam and guide anti-radiation missiles against. No less importantly they have modern highly automated digital fire control systems, not unlike Western SAMs of this era. The demands for proficiency and technical understanding of operation by crews seen in early Cold War SAM systems no longer exist – operators have sophisticated LCD panel displays with synthetic presentation. In deployment, these systems are heavily automated, using mostly hydraulic rams to elevate and unfold key system components, and thus little operator skill is needed to set up or relocate a battery – most can shoot and scoot in five minutes.

The difficulties arising from technological evolution in long range or area defence SAM systems have been exacerbated by the evolution of associated operational doctrine, which now sees the deployment of specialised equipment intended to defend SAM batteries from attack. These include:


  1. The development and deployment of advanced point defence SAMs and SPAAGMs to engage and destroy guided munitions launched against SAM sites;
  2. The development and deployment of modern emitting decoys to defeat geolocation receivers and guided munition seekers;
  3. The development and deployment of active and passive electronic, optical and infrared  countermeasures to defeat guided munition seekers;
  4. The development and deployment of Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) sensor fusion systems to defeat electronic countermeasures, and to an extent, low observables.

As a result, a modern IADS equipped with current Russian and Chinese SAM systems will be very difficult to defeat by non-lethal and lethal suppression or kill techniques. A large fraction of guided munitions launched will be shot down, or their guidance defeated.

In conclusion, the perception that contemporary Russian and Chinese SAM systems can be defeated as easily as Syrian and Iraqi systems in 1982 and 1991 is nothing more than wishful thinking, arising from a complete failure to study and understand why and how SAM defences failed or succeeded in past conflicts.








Notes and References





  1. Pratt J.C, Maj, USAF, Tactics Against NVN Air Ground Defences December 1966-1 November 1968, HQ PACAF, Directorate Tactical Evaluation, CHECO Division, 1969, Secret [Declassified 15/08/2006].

  2. Streets G.B., Gabbert R.D., Capt, USAF, A Comparative Analysis of USAF Fixed-Wing Aircraft Losses in South East Asia Combat, Technical Report AFFDL-TR-77-115, Air Force Systems Command, December, 1977.
  3. Werrell, K.P., Did USAF Technology Fail in Vietnam? Three Case Studies, Air Power Journal, Spring 1998.
  4. Momyer, W.W., Gen, USAF, Air Power in Three Wars, Air University Press, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama,
    April 2003.
  5. Tilford E.A., Setup: What the Air Force Did in Vietnam and Why, Maxwell AFB AL: Air University Press, 1991

  6. Yaacov Ro'i, Boris Morozov (Ed), The Soviet Union and the June 1967 Six Day War, Stanford University Press, 2008, URL: http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?id=15923.
  7. Cordesman A.H., Wagner, A.R., The Lessons of Modern War, Volume 1, 1990, in Yom Kippur Special, Defense Update, Number 42.
  8. Hurley M.M., C1C, USAFA, The BEKAA Valley Air Battle, June 1982: Lessons Mislearned?, Air Power Journal, Winter 1989.
  9. Kopp C., Desert Storm, The Electronic Battle, Australian Aviation, June/July/August, 1993, Aerospace Publications, URI: http://www.ausairpower.net/Analysis-ODS-EW.html.
  10. Lambeth B.S., Kosovo and the Continuing SEAD Challenge, Aerospace Power Journal, Summer, 2002, URI: http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj02/sum02/lambeth.html
  11. Martin A., Revisiting the Lessons of Operation Allied Force, Air Power Australia Analysis 2009-04,  14th June,  2009, URI: http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-2009-04.html
  12. Kopp C., Evolving Technological Strategy in Advanced Air Defense Systems, Joint Forces Quarterly, JFQ 57
    2nd Quarter, April 2010, URI: http://www.ndu.edu/press/lib/images/jfq-57/kopp.pdf
  13. De Atkine, Why Arabs Lose Wars, Middle East Quarterly, Vol.VI, No.4, December, 1999, URI: http://www.meforum.org/441/why-arabs-lose-wars




avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por dager48 el Lun Feb 27, 2017 4:55 pm

no se si se a postiado ya pero a qui estas






buk M2E
avatar
dager48

Mensajes : 162
Fecha de inscripción : 29/07/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Pechora 2M

Mensaje por gonzalojimenezm el Jue Mar 02, 2017 8:07 pm

Cordialmente invito a toda la comunidad de este distinguido foro a leer el artículo de mi autoría sobre el "Pechora" 2M venezolano que saldrá próximamente en el N°9 de la revista argentina Zona  Militar.
avatar
gonzalojimenezm

Mensajes : 207
Fecha de inscripción : 12/04/2016
Edad : 46
Localización : Venezuela

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Jue Mar 02, 2017 8:21 pm

@gonzalojimenezm escribió:Cordialmente invito a toda la comunidad de este distinguido foro a leer el artículo de mi autoría sobre el "Pechora" 2M venezolano que saldrá próximamente en el N°9 de la revista argentina Zona  Militar.


¿como le hacemos ?,acá no llega esa revista hermano... Neutral
avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Jue Mar 02, 2017 8:26 pm

Hablando de ese sistema,en ese sistema se aplica algo llamado "hibridación" y ,pese a los chillidos de supuestos expertos,convierte al viejo S-125 ,en un sistema totalmente válido para el teatro de operaciones moderno...se sospecha que este sistema está implicado en el derribo de un f-16 jordano en siria y un f-16 de emiratos arabes unidos en yemen.
avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por gonzalojimenezm el Jue Mar 02, 2017 8:26 pm

(risas) Aún no ha salido, en los próximos días se podrá leer en línea en ese site, por supuesto, tan pronto aparezca la publicación, también se podrá leer en este prestigioso foro, en el cual lo pondré a disposición inmediata como siempre.
avatar
gonzalojimenezm

Mensajes : 207
Fecha de inscripción : 12/04/2016
Edad : 46
Localización : Venezuela

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por gonzalojimenezm el Jue Mar 02, 2017 8:30 pm

@nick7777 escribió:Hablando de ese sistema,en ese sistema se aplica algo llamado "hibridación" y ,pese a los chillidos de supuestos expertos,convierte al viejo S-125 ,en un sistema totalmente válido para el teatro de operaciones moderno...se sospecha que este sistema está implicado en el derribo de un f-16 jordano en siria y un f-16 de emiratos arabes unidos en yemen.

...y de un "Predator" estadounidense en la costa siria...

La híbridación ha sido un recurso muy utilizado, también hay una buena cantidad de opciones de actualización de diversas fuentes.
avatar
gonzalojimenezm

Mensajes : 207
Fecha de inscripción : 12/04/2016
Edad : 46
Localización : Venezuela

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Jue Mar 02, 2017 8:34 pm

hermano,te iba a sugerir,que,cuando puedas,hablar un poco sobre lo relativo a la hibridación en las actualizaciones de los sistemas de defensa aérea rusos-no sabía lo del predator- cheers
avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por dager48 el Vie Mar 03, 2017 7:45 pm

@gonzalojimenezm escribió:Cordialmente invito a toda la comunidad de este distinguido foro a leer el artículo de mi autoría sobre el "Pechora" 2M venezolano que saldrá próximamente en el N°9 de la revista argentina Zona  Militar.

saludo gracia por el detalle de  darnos aviso de tu publicación, al pendiente para leer la información.
avatar
dager48

Mensajes : 162
Fecha de inscripción : 29/07/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por gonzalojimenezm el Vie Mar 03, 2017 7:59 pm

El trabajo ha sido publicado hoy en el sitio web colombiano fuerzasmilitares.org en el siguiente enlace:

http://www.fuerzasmilitares.org/opinion/7419-fanb-pechora.html

Mi intensión es montarlo aquí en un post como siempre, pero tengo problemas con el equipo donde guardo el archivo; tan pronto pueda recuperarlo, lo haré
avatar
gonzalojimenezm

Mensajes : 207
Fecha de inscripción : 12/04/2016
Edad : 46
Localización : Venezuela

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por dager48 el Vie Mar 03, 2017 8:17 pm

ok perfeto espero tu post aquí a si no entro al foro colombiano
avatar
dager48

Mensajes : 162
Fecha de inscripción : 29/07/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Vie Mar 03, 2017 8:20 pm



Gonzalo Jiménez Mora 
Analista de Seguridad y Defensa 
gonzalojimenezm@yahoo.com



Un hoyo en la empalizada
- A comienzos de los años cincuenta del siglo pasado, las dos superpotencias que emergieron como líderes del concierto de naciones luego de la Segunda Guerra Mundial se encontraban enfrascadas en una carrera por asegurarse la supremacía aérea, las dos facetas de esta lucha comprendían, por un lado la producción de aeronaves militares y armamentos aéreos cada vez más sofisticados y por otro, el desarrollo de medios antiaéreos que pudieran enfrentar eficazmente a la aviación enemiga; los EEUU y la URSS se habían beneficiado de la tecnología capturada a la Alemania Nacionalsocialista y cada nación la usó como punto de partida para diseñar nuevas armas, aviones y artilugios que pudieran agenciarles la añorada ventaja sobre su contraparte.
Después de un gran esfuerzo de investigación y desarrollo, la Unión Soviética pudo colocar en condición operativa inicial su primer sistema misilístico antiaéreo al derribar un bombardero pesado Tupolev Tu-4 (copia del B-29 "Superfortress" de EEUU) (1) volando a una cota de 7.000 metros durante una prueba que tuvo lugar el 25 de mayo de 1.953; denominado S-25 "Berkut", fue inmediatamente desplegado en un dispositivo consistente en dos anillos concéntricos de 45/50 km y 85/90 km a partir de la Plaza Roja que fue apodado por el propio Nikita Khrushchev como "moskovskiy chastokol" (la empalizada de Moscú); en noviembre de 1.957 esta protección se robusteció con la adición del sistema S-75 "Dvina" ante la aparición de bombarderos supersónicos (2).
Los soviéticos hicieron un gran esfuerzo para proteger sus cielos debido al rezago que tenían respecto a la industria aeronáutica estadounidense; por su parte los norteamericanos, más confiados en sus ventajas tecnológicas y geográficas no priorizaron de igual forma los avances en materia misilística antiaerea, en razón de ello, aunque los dispositivos defensivos de ambas naciones se instalaron en 1.953, mientras los primeros produjeron unos 32.000 misiles "Berkut" y desplegaron 58 regimientos antiaéreos en torno a su capital, los segundos solo fabricaron cerca de 16.000 misiles "Nike-Ajax" (contrapartida del S-25) y confiaron la defensa aérea de Washington a 40 batallones; luego, un cambio en la estrategia de bombardeo de occidente debilitó la "empalizada".
Soluciones tecnológicas como la sustitución de las bombas de caída libre por armas "stand off" (misiles crucero aerolanzables de gran alcance), hicieron cambiar la doctrina de ataque occidental variando hacia la penetración a baja cota de aeronaves individuales o en pequeños grupos, en patrones de vuelo no lineales; esto obligó a los diseñadores soviéticos a trabajar en un sistema que pudiera abatir a los bombarderos supersónicos y también a los misiles crucero, así como operar con efectividad contra blancos a media y baja cota (3); asi, en 1.956 comenzó el desarrollo de un nuevo antiaéreo que luego se denominaría 4K90 S-125 "Neva" (OTAN: SA-3 "Goa"; exportación: "Pechora") como complemento de los "Berkut" y "Dvina", el cual entró en servicio en 1.960.

Desarrollo de la familia de antiaéreos "Volna/Neva/Pechora"



El aparato de inteligencia soviético detectó las nuevas técnicas de bombardeo occidentales al observar las pruebas llevadas a cabo por los norteamericanos usando el bombardero B-58 "Hustler" (4), estas demostraron la validez de usar los accidentes geográficos y el relieve como forma de enmascaramiento al penetrar en el espacio aéreo del adversario a cotas medias y bajas; alarmados ante estos descubrimientos, los estrategas de Moscú exigieron al sector tecnológico de la defensa una respuesta acelerada para cerrar la brecha, se inició el diseño de un sistema que sirviera para cualquier altitud, pero ante las complejidades del caso, se acordó un rumbo paralelo basado en el trabajo ya adelantado de un antiaéreo misilístico previsto en principio para equipar la flota.
Asi fue como los avances del Ingeniero Aleksei Mihailovich Isaev, del Buró de Diseño KB-1 (5), en torno al desarrollo de un sistema antiaéreo naval que luego entraría en servicio como M-1 "Volna" (OTAN: SA-N-1 "Goa") fueron la base del sistema de cota media/baja terrestre propuesto para contrarrestar a occidente; los parámetros minimos requeridos por las autoridades soviéticas comprendían que la nueva arma pudiera usarse contra blancos que viajarán a 1.500 km/h, a altitudes de entre 100 y 5.000 metros y con alcance sobre 12 km, estos requisitos que hoy pudieran considerarse como defensa de punto, eran para la década de 1.950 consistentes con la defensa de área, todos fueron superados pero sobrevendrían otros problemas más complejos en el diseño.
Las complicaciones tuvieron que ver con la capacidad para detectar el blanco y mantener el enlace de comando para guiar el misil cuando ambos (objetivo y proyectil) se desplazaban a poca altura; particularmente se hacía necesario un nuevo tipo de radar de guía y control con mejores prestaciones en sus conjuntos reflectores que el RSNA/SNR-75 (OTAN: Fan Song) del "Dvina", la solución se basó en separar la emisión de señales de la recepción de los ecos usando la modalidad "SORO" (Scan On Receive Only), donde los elementos emisores están separados de los receptores dando la extraña y característica forma a la antena del radar SNR-125 (OTAN: Low Blow), esta configuración produjo como ventaja adicional una alta resistencia a las contramedidas.
El misil V-750 que equipaba al S-75 sirvió de base para el diseño de un mejorado proyectil 5V24 (4K90/V-600), guíado por radio como su predecesor, pero difería de el en usar propelente sólido y aletas cuadradas cruciformes; su cono de combate prefragmentado (4G90) se separaba en 3.500 esquirlas (18,9 kg de metralla) que eran impulsados por ~41 kg de alto explosivo; usaba una espoleta de proximidad de la serie 5E15; su rendimiento cinemático le permitía ser efectivo en rangos de entre 4 y 15 km y a cotas de entre 100 y 10.000 m; este misil fue paulatinamente mejorado, produciéndose una importante cantidad de variantes, la última de las cuales sufrió un rediseño en su motor y un cambio en la composición quimica del combustible, denominándose V-600P.
Las experiencias operacionales sugirieron la introducción de otras mejoras en el misil, entonces la variante V-600P fue punto de partida de otra nueva a la que se que le modificó la cabeza de guerra (5B) instalándole una espoleta de proximidad 5E18, más resistente a contramedidas y se aseguró su detonación con un mecanismo de autodestrucción 5B72; la letalidad fue maximizada ampliando la cantidad de fragmentos de metralla a unos 4.500 (21,15 kg) y disminuyó en 2kg su carga de explosivos (para un total de ~39 kg); el patrón de dispersión fue modificado, ahora no se proyectaba hacia la parte delantera en el eje de trayectoria del misil obligando un rumbo de colisión con el objetivo, sino en forma radial, permitiendo afectarlo en rumbo de aproximación lateral.
El nuevo proyectil también fue optimizado en su rendimiento aerodinámico y cinemático, dotándolo de efectividad en rangos de entre 2,5 y 22 km y a cotas de entre 20 y 14.000 m; la nomenclatura del mismo seria 5V27 (4K91/V-601), su aparición junto a una actualización electrónica de todo el sistema a mitad de la década de 1.960 creó la version S-125M; este misil, igual que su predecesor, fue sujeto de mejoras continuas que le permitieron seguir vigente a través de nuevas variantes, su uso en combate impulsó cambios que le proporcionaron más eficiencia, desde finales de la década de 1.970 la variante de munición denominada 5V27D fue capaz de enfrentar blancos aerodinámicos dentro de un alcance de entre 3,5 y 25 km a altitud de hasta 18.000 m (versión S-125M1).
Como ya se ha expresado previamente, el "Neva" fue la derivación terrestre del que llegaría a ser el primer sistema antiaéreo misilístico naval soviético en lograr la condición operativa inicial, el M-1 "Volna", aunque su desarrollo se llevó a cabo prácticamente en paralelo; las exigencias respecto a la capacidad del radar de guía para mantener el enlace en el caso de la versión marítima eran menores por la inexistencia de relieve y otras interferencias físicas significativas en el teatro naval, por ello usaba un radar distinto en función de guía y control de fuego, el 4R90; sus pruebas operacionales tuvieron lugar en 1.962, año en el que fue aceptado como apto para servicio, usaba los mismos proyectiles del "Neva" y como este, fue continuamente mejorado con el tiempo.
Un ingenioso mecanismo de recarga que resguardaba bajo cubierta los misiles los elevaba en posición vertical para insertarlos en los rieles de sujección del lanzador bimisil que luego giraba en dirección al blanco para realizar el tiro, lo cual le daba un aspecto sofisticado frente a los primeros sistemas occidentales que mantenían los misiles en el lanzador sobre cubierta; en los primeros modelos (lanzador ZIF-101) los proyectiles disponibles eran 16 unidades, ampliándose la cantidad a 32 municiones en un modelo posterior (ZIF-102). La aparición del misil 5V27 y el mejoramiento de la electrónica produjo la versión M-1M "Volna M"; la adición de sistemas pasivos de guía y mayor resistencia a las contramedidas creó el "Volna P" a mediados de la década de los setenta.
Hacia finales de esa misma década se incorporó el uso de la variante del proyectil 5V27D, su perfil cinemático optimizado significó el rediseño de la electronica, los sistemas de detección y de guía, aumentando su efectividad y dando pie a la versión "Volna N". El M-1 esta en operación a bordo de cinco destructores clase "Rajput" (tipo "Kashin") de la India y en el "Komsomolets Ukrainy" de Rusia ("Kashin" modificado). Por su parte, el derivado terrestre fue profusamente exportado desde la época soviética y aun permanece en los arsenales de casi treinta naciones en diversas versiones, en algunos países han sufrido modificaciones y actualizaciones de las que se disertará más adelante; el S-125 fue un elemento importante de la política exterior soviética.

El S-125: Moneda de cambio de la influencia soviética en el tercer mundo




Durante la época de la "Guerra Fria", la transferencia de armas se constituyó en parte crucial de estrategia geopolítica soviética referente a las relaciones con los países del llamado "Tercer Mundo", las características y prestaciones del S-125 siempre llamaron la atención de aquellas naciones que por alguna circunstancia pasaban a ser una pieza importante del esfuerzo de Moscú por lograr la supremacía sobre los EEUU y sus aliados occidentales en la puja por la hegemonía mundial; la potencia comunista estuvo bien dispuesta a vender el antiaéreo como compensación por permisos de atraque, facilidades portuarias, uso de bases aéreas o de inteligencia electrónica y preposicionamiento de equipos; esto promovió su amplia difusión que alcanzó cuatro continentes.
Casos emblemáticos son las entregas de sistemas "Pechora" a Yemen y Vietnam en la década de 1.970; en el país arabe como contraprestación por el uso de la base de Khormaksar, el puerto de Aden y amplios derechos en las islas de Socotra y Perim; en la Indochina por el derecho a que los buques de la Armada Roja recalaran en la base de la bahia de Cam Ranh. Pero a veces el "Pechora" también se usó como forma de contrarrestar la influencia de otras potencias, tal fue el caso de la entrega de 30 baterías a Corea del Norte en 1.985 con el fin no sólo de obtener el permiso de atraque de la flota moscovita y derechos de sobrevuelo a la aviación sovietica, sino también para mitigar la importante ascendencia de la China Popular sobre el régimen de Pyonyang.
Otras motivaciones también se convirtieron en razón del suministro de S-125 a otros países, ejemplo fue la necesidad de penetrar e influenciar a su favor el nacionalismo arabe, paricularmente en Siria, Egipto y Libia (6), donde la adquisición del sistema significó la llegada de grandes contingentes de efectivos militares de la URSS en plan de instructores y "asesores", comprometiendo en cierto grado su soberanía. En otras ocasiones, el S-125 se transfirió para apuntalar la estabilidad o la fuerza militar en naciones cuyos gobiernos tenían orientación socialista y se sentían amenazados por naciones vecinas, así fue en Cuba, Angola o Mozambique; en el caso de estos dos últimos paises, se puede hablar también de un contrapeso a China.

Desempeño del S-125 en combate




El S-125 "Neva/Pechora" ha visto considerable acción en combate e incluso ha sido protagonista de experiencias casi legendarias que le valieron fama mundial (una de las cuales se tratará en tema aparte), ha dicho presente en muchos de los principales conflictos acaecidos durante el más de medio siglo que tiene en condición operativa a través de todas sus versiones y variantes; así mismo se han tejido algunos mitos sobre su participación en algunos teatros (que luego se aclararán). Uno de los escenarios de mayor participación del S-125 fue el medio oriente, desde la larga sucesión de desencuentros árabes-israelíes hasta las más recientes y actuales acciones que involucran la intervención bélica directa en esa zona de las grandes potencias mundiales.
Desde comienzo de la década de 1.970, Egipto comenzó a recibir una gran cantidad de baterías de S-125 "Pechora" y 2K12 "Kub" con ambos antiaéreos organizó una cerrada red de defensa aeroespacial, junto a los sistemas llegaron cerca de 7.500 efectivos soviéticos en plan de "asesoramiento"; fueron intensamente usados durante la "guerra de desgaste", de marzo a julio de 1.970 los "Pechora" egipcios fueron responsables de al menos 9 derribos de aviones israelíes y durante la Guerra del Yom Kippur, las baterías dispuestas como barrera defensiva en el frente de Suez (donde sólo operó este modelo) bajaron del cielo otros 10 aparatos de esa nación solo en el curso de la tarde del 6 de octubre de 1.973, primer día de la guerra, según fuentes de EEUU (7).
Siria tambien desplegó el S-125 en la Guerra del Yom Kippur, existe gran discrepancia entre ambos bandos por las cifras de derribos, fuentes pro israelíes estiman solo en tres los aviones abatidos por los "Pechora" sirios, sin embargo, tan pequeña cantidad no se compagina con la magnitud de la reacción israelí ante el despliegue sirio del S-125 en el valle Beqaa en 1.981 que creó la "Crisis de los SAM", eventualmente solucionada por negociaciones entre Damasco y Jerusalén, esto puso en evidencia la gran importancia que el gobierno judío le otorga a esta amenaza; luego, durante la invasión del Líbano en 1.982, los Israelíes montaron la operación "Mole Cricket 19" para suprimir 19 baterías de S-125 ubicadas al norte de Siria, eliminando la mayoría de ellas.
El "Pechora" vería aun más acción sobre oriente medio, esta vez en el marco de una de las más largas y cruentas guerras del Siglo XX, la que enfrentó a Irán e Irak. Si bien, esta guerra fue en extremo cubierta por la prensa mundial, son en realidad muy pocas las informaciones verificables que pueden obtenerse de ella, sobretodo en el aspecto aéreo de la misma. Se sabe que Irak desplegó y utilizó el S-125; como los otros países de la zona, esa nación había descubierto un hecho incontrovertible sobre el concepto del control aéreo en la guerra basado en los conflictos árabe-israelíes: el uso de un fuerte y masivo dispositivo basado en misiles superficie/aire causa severas pérdidas a una fuerza aérea atacante brindando una barrera defensiva muy efectiva (Cool.
Irak se apoyó en los soviéticos como suplidores de material militar desde finales de los años cincuenta, afianzándose la preponderancia de Moscú en la defensa antiaerea, aun cuando Baghdad mantuvo vínculos en otras áreas de la defensa con Francia y Reino Unido; para 1.980 el sistema de defensa aérea misilística se constituía en un servicio separado dentro de la fuerza aérea que absorbía una cuarta parte de los 40.000 efectivos de esa rama, estaba conformada por sistemas S-75 "Dvina", S-125 "Pechora" y en menor medida por 2K12 "Kub", problemas organizativos y las técnicas implementadas por los pilotos iraníes les restaron efectividad, siendo complementados más tarde con sistemas "Roland" y "Crotale" provistos por los fabricantes europeos.
Las últimas actuaciones conocidas del S-125 "Pechora" en los escenarios de oriente medio han ocurrido en el marco del conflicto que se desarrolla actualmente en la República Árabe Siria; el día 17 de marzo de 2.015, el Comando Central de EEUU perdió contacto con un vehículo aéreo no tripulado dedicado a la recolección de información de inteligencia y reconocimiento MQ-1 "Predator" que se encontraba en misión en la costa oeste de Siria siendo operado desde una base en Incirlik (Turquía); la agencia oficial de noticias siria SANA mostró imágenes de los restos del aparato indicando que fue derribado cerca de Latakia por un sistema S-125 "Pechora" de la defensa aérea de ese país en la misma zona en la que cayó previamente un RF-4E turco (9).
Otra zona donde el S-125 ha sido usado fue el África Subsahariana; durante las primeras fases de la largas guerras en Angola y Namibia, y hasta la llegada de la aviación de caza cubana, la fuerza aérea sudafricana tuvo un dominio casi exclusivo del espacio aéreo sobre el teatro de operaciones, golpeando los campamentos del SWAPO (10) situados en el sur de Angola, ante esta situación el gobierno angoleño solicitó ayuda soviética, esta se materializó en la instalación de 75 equipos móviles de radar de siete variados tipos situados en 23 locaciones diferentes que apoyaban a una gran cantidad de baterías tubulares y misilísticas de diversos modelos, fijas, semifijas, móviles y portatiles entre las que se encontraba el S-125 "Pechora", que vio acción varias veces.
Durante el desarrollo de la operación aéreoterrestre "Sceptic/Smokeshell" lanzada por Sudáfrica contra las bases del SWAPO en Angola en junio de 1.980, la Fuerza Aérea Sudafricana hizo uso intensivo de sus aviones Dassault "Mirage" F1, Blackburn "Buccaneer" S.50 y Atlas "Impala" Mk.II como aviones de ataque a tierra, apoyo y en patrullas de combate, el sistema de defensa angoleño tuvo la oportunidad de ser probado en múltiples ocasiones; el 7 de junio, dos aviones Dassault "Mirage" F1 sudafricanos fueron alcanzados por misiles "Pechora" cuando atacaban posiciones adversarias, debido a los daños realizaron aterrizajes de emergencia en Ruacana y Ondangwa, fuentes sudafricanas afirman que fueron reparados y volvieron a condición operativa.

Incertidumbre sobre su uso en la Guerra de Vietnam




Al consultar en la Red sobre la historia operativa del S-125, suelen encontrarse datos contradictorios acerca de su posible despliegue en el sudeste asiático en el marco de la Guerra de Vietnam, algunas fuentes le atribuyen el derribo de un F-4C "Phantom" en las inmediaciones de Hanoi el 24 de julio de 1.965 que ocasionó la respuesta estadounidense operación "Iron Hand", sin embargo, el articulista y autor norteamericano Steven J. Zaloga afirma que este sistema nunca fue desplegado en Vietnam por el temor de los soviéticos de que pudiera ser copiado por los chinos, con quienes existía en ese momento una tensa relación (11), este destacado escritor señala que el misil que realizó el derribo fue lanzado por un sistema S-75 "Dvina" (OTAN: SA-2 "Guideline").
No obstante, otro destacado articulista y autor hungaro, István Toperczer, ha publicado algunas investigaciones soportadas por material fotográfico que podrían respaldar la tesis de que en efecto el "Phantom" cayó víctima del S-125 o al menos de que el sistema se uso en Vietnam e intervino en la defensa de aeródromos, bases y otras infraestructuras vitales de Vietnam del Norte, particularmente en 1.972 ante las operaciones "Freedom Train", "Linebacker" y "Linebacker II"; pero posiblemente su protagonismo en esa conflagración bélica no haya sido tan sobresaliente como si lo fue el del sistema S-75; así mismo, el probable desempeño operacional del S-125 en Vietnam con frecuencia se exagera, adjudicándole cifras de derribos francamente difíciles de validar (12).

La caza de un halcón nocturno y las víctimas no reconocidas




El episodio bélico más famoso que involucró al sistema S-125 ocurrió el 27 de marzo de 1.999 en los cielos sobre una pequeña y hasta entonces casi anónima aldea serbia llamada Budjanovci ubicada en la región de Vojvodina; transcurría la tercera noche de la operación "Noble Anvil", la campaña de bombardeo de la OTAN, enmarcada en la operación "Allied Force" para obligar a Serbia a aceptar la separación territorial de Kosovo; exactamente a las 20 horas 42 minutos y 18 segundos, un avión que hasta ese momento se constituía en orgullo de la tecnología aeronáutica estadounidense fue detectado en los radares de una batería del 3° Batallón de la 250° Brigada de Defensa Aérea Misilística del Ejercito Yugoslavo por el sargento Dragan Matić.
Era un avión furtivo de ataque F-117A "Nighthawk" (13), que hasta ese día se había granjeado la fama de ser invencible luego de sus acciones en Panamá e Irak, la misma aeronave que inauguró una nueva generación de máquinas diseñadas para minimizar su área de cruce de radar, dificultando su detección por ese método (mal llamadas "invisibles"); al ser descubierto volaba a unos 50 km de la posición de la batería antiaérea. Un inteligente teniente coronel serbio de etnia húngara llamado Zoltán Dani estaba a cargo, este militar yugoslavo había estudiado todo el material referente al F-117A facilitado por los servicios secretos de su país durante los 10 años previos a esa noche y al comenzar el conflicto presentó a sus jefes una solución para enfrentar al enemigo sigiloso.
Los menos confiados superiores de Dani le prohibieron realizar su plan, puesto que pensaban que las emisiones prolongadas del radar pondrían en evidencia la posición de la batería exponiéndola al fuego de supresión de misiles anti-radar; el osado teniente coronel calculó el tiempo justo necesario para el enganche del blanco y lleno de convicción decidió prepararse para hacer historia en la primera oportunidad que tuviera, aun desobedeciendo las órdenes de sus comandantes. Así fue que solo 21 segundos después de ser detectado, el "diamante sin esperanzas" (14) fue abatido. Con los años Dani ha concedido muchas entrevistas y hasta existen varios documentales y narraciones sobre lo sucedido, pero el nunca ha revelado con exactitud el método usado (15).
Sin embargo, por lo poco que ha salido a la luz en sus declaraciones se infiere que la detección fue posible usando emisiones del radar de adquisición de blancos en ondas muy largas mientras el avión tenia abiertas sus bahías de bombas y accionando el radar de guía semiactiva durante unos 17 cruciales segundos (algunos menos de los calculados por Zoltán Dani) para lograr el enganche; a diferencia de todos los hombres bajo su mando, el teniente coronel no fue condecorado por su logro como medida punitiva de su desobediencia, pero como todos los involucrados fue ascendido y se convirtió en héroe para Serbia; con los cambios políticos acaecidos luego, personas como el fueron relegados por la nueva dirigencia pro-occidental y se retiró.
La brigada de Zoltán Dani derribó también un caza F-16 el 2 de mayo; otros aciertos no confirmados por EEUU corresponden al supuesto derribo de un bombardero B-2 "Spirit" el 19 de mayo, el cual cayó en territorio croata según fuentes serbias y al daño de otro F-117A que aterrizó de emergencia en Bosnia; aunque la defensa aérea serbia se basaba en la versión usada por el Ejército Popular Yugoslavo correspondiente al S-125M "Neva M" de 1.964 (solo modificado para hacerlo más móvil en virtud de evitar su localización por parte de los satélites espías de la alianza atlántica), esta logró mantenerse durante los 79 días de bombardeo y la paz fue acordada bajo las condiciones serbias: la OTAN no pudo entrar en Kosovo, sino los cascos azules de la ONU (16).

El primeros usuarios del "Pechora" en Latinoamerica




El sistema S-125 "Pechora" se constituyó por espacio de la década de 1.970 en uno de los antiaéreos más avanzados de la región latinoamericana y no ha sido retirado aun por ninguno de sus usuarios; los sistemas de detección asociados a esta arma también prestan servicio en algunas naciones de la América hispanohablante que no usan el misil, este es el caso de Ecuador y Nicaragua, que operan el radar P-15 como parte de sus dispositivos de alerta y monitoreo del espacio aéreo pero no poseen baterías de misiles de ninguna de las versiones del "Pechora". Los usuarios más antiguos del sistema S-125 en la región americana son la Fuerza Aérea de la República del Perú y la Defensa Antiaérea y Fuerza Aérea Revolucionaria de la República de Cuba.
El 3 de octubre de 1.968, el general del Ejército del Perú, Juan Velasco Alvarado (que comenzó su carrera como soldado raso), derrocó mediante un golpe incruento al presidente de esa nacion, Fernando Belaúnde Terry; con una visión política nacionalista y popular identificada con la izquierda e impulsado por un sentimiento de reivindicación del territorio perdido ante Chile en 1.879, Velasco comenzó un programa de rearme de mil millones de dólares que se llevó a cabo entre 1.969 y 1.973, convirtiendose en cliente estrella de la Unión Soviética, adquiriendo tanques, transportes blindados, artillería, lanzacohetes, aviones de combate y baterías antiaéreas, estas últimas del modelo S-125 "Pechora" para equipar 6 batallones que se emplazaron al centro y sur del pais.
Para el momento de la redacción de este trabajo, el autor no pudo reunir elementos suficientes para señalar sin dudas la época en que el S-125 llegó a Cuba, algunas fuentes aseguran que luego de los sucesos de octubre de 1.962 los soviéticos accedieron transferir el antiaéreo, otras explican que solo a raíz del suministro a Vietnam y Egipto, a comienzo de la década de 1.970, Moscú liberó su exportación a Cuba (y a Perú). La Habana cuenta con 4 brigadas antiaéreas con unos 28 batallones de misiles S-125 y S-75, son 48 baterias, de las que sólo 12 corresponden al "Pechora" (48 lanzadores); su estatus es incierto, pero es público y notorio que al menos una bateria ha sido objeto de modificaciones que la hacen movil, algo de lo que se disertará más adelante.


Los usuarios actuales






El S-125 esta presente hoy en los arsenales de 29 naciones en unas ocho versiones/modificaciones distintas de las que la más extendida es la versión de exportación S-125 "Pechora" (OTAN: SA-3 "Goa") en servicio en Angola, Armenia, Bulgaria, Corea del Norte, Etiopía, India, Kyrgyzstan, Mozambique, Perú, Siria, Tanzania, Turkmenistán, Uganda, Uzbekistán, Zambia y Cuba (que tambien opera la modificación local autopropulsada "Pechora/T-55"); el "Pechora" tambien es activo en Azerbaiyán, país que además heredó de la URSS la versión "Neva" junto con Kazajstán y Moldavia como estados sucesores de la antigua superpotencia, los tres la mantienen en operacion. El "Neva" se transfirió a algunos aliados cercanos de Moscú en la Guerra Fria.
Tal es el caso de Argelia y Serbia (antiguamente Yugoslavia) que actualmente lo combinan con la versión "Pechora M" (OTAN: SA-3A "Goa") que también usa Egipto junto al novedoso "Pechora 2M" (OTAN: SA-26 "Goa") que fue adquirido recientemente por Myanmar y Venezuela. Tayikistán y Mongolia operan el "Pechora 2A" (OTAN: SA-3B "Goa"); Vietnam y Kazajstán usan la versión "Pechora 2TM" (OTAN: SA-26 "Goa") y Polonia mantiene en operación una modificación local del antiguo "Neva" rebautizada "Newa". Como ya se señaló con anterioridad, la India y Rusia son los unicos países que mantienen la derivación naval en servicio con la versión M-1N "Volna N" a bordo de sus destructores de la familia "Kashin" (clases "Rajput" y "Komsomolets Ukrainy").

Los paquetes de actualización y versiones modernas




El sistema S-125 posee ciertas ventajas sobre sus predecesores e incluso sobre algunos antiaéreos de diseño posterior en cuanto a su capacidad de ser actualizado y modernizado, su modularidad y la forma de concepción del misil (aun vigente), hacen a todo el sistema más propenso a aceptar cambios y adaptaciones, la mayoría de los cuales tienen que ver con su electrónica y con su movilidad. La que luce más sencilla es la actualización cubana que consiste en la instalación del lanzador 5P73 de cuatro rieles sobre el chasis de un tanque T-55 al que se le retiró la torreta, al menos cuatro ejemplares de este vehículo desfilaron en la Habana en conmemoracion del Día de la Revolucion en 2.006 con solo dos misiles cada uno, se desconocen otros datos técnicos.
Otra actualización del mismo orden fue realizada en Polonia por la empresa Cenrex y el Ejército Polaco, designada S-125M "Newa SC", comprende la instalación del lanzador 5P73 sobre chasis WZT-1 (17) y radar SNR-125 en un camión MAZ-543 8x8 "Kashalot" (proveniente del antiguo sistema de misiles balísticos "Scud", al que se le ha retirado el lanzador/erector 9P117); una variante "Newa C" lleva instalado el lanzador 5P73 en ese mismo camión; los polacos han renovado totalmente la electrónica digitalizándola y aportando una estación de comando y control de nueva construcción; reportan un incremento de la efectividad y de la resistencia a contramedidas electronicas; Rusia ha bloqueado su exportación y la OTAN exige su salida de servicio en Polonia.
La Empresa Unitaria Científico-Industrial Tetraedr, de Bielorrusia, desarrollo un paquete de modernización denominado S-125T "Pechora 2T" con electrónica totalmente digital y cuya característica mas resaltante a la vista es la sustitución de la antena parabólica superior del radar SNR-125 por una nueva antena plana de apertura sintetica cambiando su denominación a UNV-2TM; la resistencia a contramedidas electrónicas ha aumentado más de cien veces sobre el diseño original; una variante con un remolque modificado para el radar y lanzador autopropulsado designada S-125-2T "Pechora 2TM" que disminuye el tiempo de despliegue fue recientemente adquirida por Vietnam y Kazajstán; esta modernización incluye la adición de sistema de posicionamiento satelital.
El fabricante original del "Neva", GSKB Almaz-Antey también creo su propio paquete de actualización llamado S-125-2A "Pechora 2A", entre las mejoras se cuenta la inclusión de detección electro-óptica, la electrónica fue mejorada con componentes de uso en el sistema S-300PMU y tiene posibilidad de compatibilizar e hibridizarse con antiguos antiaéreos como el S-75 (el paquete de modernización S-75-2 "Dvina 2" posee gran cantidad de elementos comunes al "Pechora 2A"), el rango de detección y seguimiento se ha ampliado y se incrementó su resistencia a las contramedidas electronicas, la vida útil del sistema es ahora mayor y los lapsos entre revisiones rutinarias son más amplios, de igual forma que el periodo antes de cada inspección mayor.
La empresa ucraniana Aerotechnica MLT ofrece un paquete de modernización denominado S-125-2D "Pechora 2D" para alargar la vida útil de versiones anteriores en al menos 15 años, comprende el remplazo del 90% de los componentes electrónicos y la actualización de las piezas mayores de equipo tales como antena de radar (UNV-2D, mejorando en un índice de 1,49 la capacidad de detección) y lanzadores (5P73-2D); una nueva cabina de control digitalizada autopropulsada (UNK-2D) basada en el chasis de camión 6x6 KrAZ-260 hace parte del paquete; se ha integrado sistema de posicionamiento satelital y compás magnético digital, así como la capacidad de usar sistemas optrónicos; esta modernizacion ópera solo con la variante de misil 5V27D.
El consorcio industrial ruso-bieloruso Oboronitelnye Sistemy (Sistemas Defensivos) nacido como consecuencia de un proceso de licitación internacional convocado por Egipto en 1.999 para modernizar su defensa antiaerea (que ganó con el "Pechora 2M", del que se tratará más adelante), ha ideado una versión desplegable en y desde contenedores de carga de tamaño estandar cuyos elementos son transportados en remolques, este se denomina S-125-2K "Pechora 2K"; usa lanzadores cuádruples modernizados 5P73-2K; una nueva y moderna electrónica digitalizada le proporciona un aumento de la confiabilidad y gran resistencia a las contramedidas, puede incorporar sistemas de detección pasivos y su rendimiento ha aumentado en todos los renglones.


Concepción de la version S-125-2M "Pechora 2M"




A finales de la década de 1.990, la otrora formidable defensa antiaérea egipcia que, aunque contaba con sistemas 2K12 "Kub" de origen soviético y antiaéreos occidentales "Hawk" y "Crotale", se basaba en mayor medida en sistemas S-75 y S-125 adquiridos en los años sesenta y setenta, se estaba quedando desfasada; la sustitución de la gran cantidad de baterías de estos dos modelos (sobre 400 unidades) suponía un gran esfuerzo económico, por tanto, se consideró aprovechar el material disponible con un proceso de repotenciación; el "Dvina" y el "Pechora" necesitaban una modernización radical para volver a ser efectivos, el gobierno de El Cairo abrió una licitación internacional cuyos resultados fueron los sistemas S-75M "Volkhov" y S-125-2M "Pechora 2M".
En este proceso se erigió triunfador para la modernización del "Pechora" el consorcio Oboronitelnye Sistemy con un concepto del Buró de Diseño Kuntsevo; el S-125-2M tuvo ocasión de mostrarse al mundo por primera vez el 29 de julio de 2.006 en el desfile militar del día de la independencia de esa nación norafricana; los cambios más resaltantes a simple vista comprenden el montaje de un lanzador de dos rieles (no es el 5P71 sino una versión aligerada derivada del 5P73 denominada 5P73-2M) y la antena de radar modernizada (UNV-2M) sobre el chasis de camión MZKT-8022 (en vehículos separados) y al transportador/recargador chasis ZIL-131 se le ha dotado con los elementos de elevación necesarios para su operación con el nuevo modelo de lanzador.
La mejora ha hecho énfasis en algunos puntos fundamentales: el incremento en la resistencia a contramedidas electrónicas y misiles anti-radar mediante el uso de electrónica de última generación y señuelos emisores; la reducción del tiempo de despliegue y repliegue, acortando los lapsos hasta un máximo de 25 minutos (si se precisa de la colocación de los señuelos), lo cual se ha logrado incorporando sistemas de posicionamiento satelital, enlaces de datos libres de cables en canales de radio codificados y la autopropulsión de los componentes; mayor capacidad de detección usando elementos optrónicos y de imagen termal; así como la optimización del sistema para enfrentar misiles crucero modernos aumentando el rendimiento del perfil cinemático del proyectil.
En este último punto resalta la aparición de una nueva variante de misil denominada 5V27DE que ha incrementado el alcance a entre 3 y 32 km (hasta 35 km según ciertas fuentes), es capaz de actuar a cotas de entre 20 y 20.000 metros y puede enfrentar blancos con velocidades de hasta 700 m/s (el modelo anterior, 5V27D, no podía batir objetivos que viajarán a más de 560 m/s), el sistema de guía del misil ha sido modificado para poder recibir información desde dos antenas de radar UNV-2M en forma simultánea o alternativa, asegurando así que no se rompa el enlace de control, su carga de combate también fue incrementada. El sistema S-125-2M "Pechora 2M" también puede usar las variantes de misiles de las versiones "Neva/Volna/Pechora" anteriores.
Una batería "Pechora 2M" consta de hasta 8 vehículos lanzadores que pueden operar con plena seguridad a una distancia de hasta 10 km del centro de comando y control, tal dispersión combinada con su movilidad y el uso de señuelos le otorga una alta tasa de sobrevivencia ante ataques enemigos y le permite cubrir un área de alrededor de 6.000 km2 en términos de destrucción de blancos. La resistencia a interferencia radioeléctrica pasó de 200 W/MHz a 2000 W/MHz respecto a la versión S-125M; se redujo el tiempo entre deteccion y adquisición del blanco a no más de 3 segundos y los señuelos (no presentes en versiones anteriores) reportan un índice de eficacia en la desviación de misiles antiradiación de 0,96-0,98 contra ataques desde dos direcciones.
La Organización del Tratado del Atlántico Norte ha dado la nueva nomenclatura SA-26 "Goa" al Oboronitelnye Sistemy S-125-2M "Pechora 2M" (que comparte por sus similitudes y prestaciones análogas con el Tetraedr S-125-2TM) reconociendo que por las características de movilidad, dispersión, tecnología y rendimiento se trata de un nuevo sistema más que de un paquete de modernización. Aunque el "Pechora 2M" fue concebido como una alternativa de actualización a clientes que tuvieran en uso sistemas "Pechora" de versiones anteriores, ha llamado la atención de varias naciones luego de su adquisición por parte de Egipto y ya existen otros dos usuarios que curiosamente no entran en ese grupo pero lo han incorporado a sus arsenales: Myanmar y Venezuela.

La adquisición del 4K91 S-125-2M "Pechora 2M" por la FANB




A mitad de la década pasada, como consecuencia de la adopción del nuevo paradigma doctrinal llamado "Defensa Integral de la Nacion" (18) comenzó a gestionarse la adquisición de equipos misilísticos y artillería tubular para conformar un sistema estratificado previsto para funcionar en modo integrado al dispositivo conformado por otros antiaéreos y radares ya en inventario, así como con nuevos radares de largo alcance; todo monitoreado desde el Centro de Dirección de Defensa Aérea (en funcionamiento desde 2.008) mediante enlace satelital; el conjunto resultante se denominó en un principio "Sistema de Defensa Aérea Integral" y se edificó teniendo como plataforma inicial el plan de desarrollo del Comando de Operaciones de la Defensa Aerea (19).
A tal efecto y como piedra angular de la estrategia de negación del espacio aéreo a potenciales agresores, se escogió al 4K91 S-125-2M "Pechora 2M" en virtud de cumplir con los requisitos establecidos en la planificación militar, con la particularidad de que al no ser la FANB usuaria de versiones anteriores del "Pechora", todos los elementos del sistema son de nueva construcción, diferenciándose de los ejemplares egipcios en algunos detalles como el uso de vehículos transportadores/recargadores en chasis de camión Ural-4210, así como la utilizacion solo de la munición de mayor alcance y cota, con características físicas realzadas y perfil cinemático optimizado contra aeronaves y misiles de crucero modernos 5V27DE (4K91DE/V-601DE).
Componentes de la primera batería adquirida arribaron a Venezuela por el terminal marítimo de Puerto Cabello en mayo del año 2.011 y su presentación oficial en público ocurrió en 2.012 en un desfile militar conmemorativo de los 20 años de los sucesos del 4 de febrero de 1.992; el general Henry Rangel Silva, quien se desempeñaba como Ministro de Defensa para ese entonces, declaró en abril de 2.012 que el emplazamiento de la primera unidad dotada del antiaéreo, el 192° Grupo Misilístico de Defensa Antiaérea "Coronel Silva Echenique", seria una base en las inmediaciones del Aeropuerto Internacional "Josefa Camejo" cerca del principal complejo de refinación de petróleo de Venezuela en la península de Paraguana en el estado Falcón al norte del pais.
Segun ha informado el Centro de Análisis del Comercio Mundial de Armas, con sede en Moscú, la Fuerza Armada Nacional Bolivariana habría adquirido 11 baterías completas; el primer disparo con munición real del sistema misilístico "Pechora 2M" en suelo venezolano se llevó a cabo el 15 de abril de 2.015 en el marco del ejercicio militar de simulacro de artillería antiaérea y de campaña "Escudo Soberano 2015", en San Carlos del Meta, municipio Pedro Camejo, estado Apure; en tal ocasión se contó con la presencia del Ministro de la Defensa, Vladimir Padrino López y la asistencia de observadores militares de otras naciones, entre los que destacaban los generales Alexandre Dragovalovskiy, del ejército de Rusia y Joaquín Quitas, del ejército de Cuba.
El disparo más reciente del sistema "Pechora 2M" venezolano tuvo lugar en el mismo polígono el 14 de enero de 2.017 en ocasión de las maniobras militares "Zamora 200"; el tipo de diana de práctica usado en estos simulacros nunca ha sido publicitado por la FANB, pero es presumible que se trate de un blanco simulador disparado desde el sistema de lanzacohetes múltiple autopropulsado BM-21-1 "Grad" del Ejército Bolivariano (20), del mismo tipo de los IVTs-M1/M2 comercializados por la empresa bielorusa Tetraedr, que usan el cohete 9M22U y proporcionan el perfil aerobalístico necesario para la prueba del S-125-2M, así como para los sistemas "Igla-S" y "Buk M2E"; esta especulación del autor podría explicar la coincidencia en tiempo y lugar del despliegue del "Grad" (21).
La Base Fundamental del Sistema Defensivo Aeroespacial.
El sistema 9K91 S-125-2M "Pechora 2M" ha venido a constituirse en la pieza fundamental de la defensa aeroespacial venezolana, siendo el de prestaciones más modestas entre los considerados de "defensa de área", categoría en la que entran también el "Buk M2E" y el "Antey 2500", todos los demás antiaéreos pertenecen, según los estándares actuales, a la "defensa de punto" (22); por tal motivo se convierte dentro de la planificación militar en la base del "dominio negativo del espacio aéreo", considerado de nivel estratégico frente al nivel táctico de los sistemas de menor alcance; su incorporación al arsenal nacional se erige como un hito en la historia militar del pais por sus características, sin duda el "Pechora 2M" ha hecho más seguros los cielos de la patria.
 
Gonzalo Jiménez Mora 
Analista de Seguridad y Defensa 
gonzalojimenezm@yahoo.com
 
Notas Referenciales:
(1) El bombardero Tupolev Tu-4 (OTAN: "Bull") fue una copia de ingeniería inversa de algun ejemplar que aterrizó de emergencia en territorio soviético luego de operar contra Japón en las postrimerias de la guerra; prácticamente idéntico al B-29, del que sólo difería en el espesor de las planchas con las que estaba fabricado y otros detalles menores, se constituyó en el primer bombardero pesado de largo alcance con capacidad nuclear de la URSS.
(2) Para más información sobre el desarrollo de los primeros sistemas antiaéreos misilísticos sovieticos se recomienda consultar los trabajos: "El Sistema Antiaéreo-Antimisil 9A317E 'Buk' M2E Venezolano" y "El Sistema Antiaéreo-Antimisil 9K81M S-300VM 'Antey 2500' Venezolano" del autor.
(3) En realidad el S-125 era una solución de compromiso en tanto los soviéticos buscaban una fórmula que cubriera todo el espectro posible: alcanzar a los bombarderos a gran distancia antes de que lanzarán sus proyectiles, lidiar con la amenaza de los misiles crucero y operar con efectividad contra blancos a cualquier altura, requisitos estos con los que paralelamente al "Neva" se comenzó a concebir el fallido RZ-25 "Dal" ("Distancia", OTAN: SA-5 "Griffon"); sólo después de muchos años pudo lograrse el objetivo con la familia S-300.
(4) Estas pruebas tuvieron influencia en los diseños futuros de aeronaves estadounidenses como el F-111/FB-111 y el B-1.
(5) El Buró de Diseño KB-1 se denominaría luego MKB Strela y más tarde TsKB Almaz, hoy es parte del Consorcio GSKB Almaz-Antey, que también agrupa a NPO Novator, MNIIRE Altair y MKB Fakel.
(6) Estos países también fueron proveedores de facilidades portuarias y aeroportuarias para las fuerzas militares de la Unión Soviética.
(7) Segun estudios de Ronald E. Bergquist, quien hizo una larga carrera como oficial de inteligencia en la USAF y se desempeño como investigador asociado del "Airpower Research Institute" desde comienzos de la década de 1.980.
(Cool El general paquistaní S. A. el-Edroos, observador en la guerra de 1.973 y simpatizante de la causa árabe describiría que: "...ese conflicto demostró la inherente capacidad ofensiva de una fuerza aérea y la potencial capacidad defensiva de un efectivo sistema de defensa aerea, pero los árabes solo usaron una mitad de la ecuación, confiando en su defensa misilística como si fuera una 'Línea Maginot' en el cielo, el resultado inevitable fue una brecha en el sistema defensivo causada por la combinación de ataques aéreos y terrestres israelíes..."
(9) Curiosamente en el área donde fue derribado el "drone" no existen blancos de interés pertenecientes al Estado Islamico, justificación esbozada por los estadounidenses para la operación de medios aéreos en Siria, por esas fechas tampoco se desarrollaban en la zona combates entre el gobierno y la llamada "oposición moderada", por lo que ha quedado poco clara la misión del aparato.
(10) Organización del Pueblo de África del Sudoeste, de corte socialista, uno de los bandos en pugna en el proceso independentista de lo que luego sería Namibia, gozaba del amparo y ayuda del gobierno angoleño.
(11) Cuyo momento mas crítico ocurrió en marzo de 1.969 durante el conflicto fronterizo sino-soviético por la isla Damanskiy (Zhenbao para los chinos) en el río Ussuri, al respecto se recomienda revisar "El Sistema Lanzacohetes Múltiple Autopropulsado BM-21-1 'Grad' del Ejército Bolivariano" del autor.
(12) Istvan Toperczer es cirujano de vuelo con la Fuerza Aérea Húngara. Se ha convertido en uno de los pocos individuos extranjeros a los que Vietnam ha dado acceso abierto a los ficheros de la Fuerza Aérea Popular Vietnamita; ha hecho varias visitas a Hanoi y otras ciudades vietnamitas durante años y se ha entrevistado con muchas personalidades dentro de las que se cuentan los principales "ases" y comandantes de los años de la guerra; ha publicado varios libros sobre el aspecto aéreo de la conflagración.
(13) Contradictoriamente a la designación del aparato usando la letra "F" que identifica a los cazas (por "fighter"), este avión no fue diseñado para combate aéreo sino para ataque a blancos en tierra y bombardeo táctico. El avión, serial 82-0806 cuyo indicativo radial era "Vega-31" y que estaba regularmente asignado al capitán Ken 'Wiz' Dwelle, era pilotado esa noche por el teniente coronel Dale Zelko, que se eyectó y fue rescatado más tarde, nótese la coincidencia en las iniciales de su nombre, que son inversas a las del responsable de su derribo, ambos hombres tuvieron la posibilidad de conocerse en persona en el año 2.011.
(14) En razón de su extraño aspecto faceteado, la maqueta del prototipo del avion F-117 usada en pruebas para medir su área de cruce de radar (suspendida sobre una pértiga) fue jocosamente bautizada por los encargados de la prueba como "el diamante sin esperanzas", debido a la dificultad evidente de que pudiera lograr la estabilidad suficiente para volar en forma controlada (lo que sin embargo fue posible usando tecnología de "fly-by-wire"); este mote fue escogido luego para bautizar el proyecto entero como "The Hopeless Diamond".
(15) Según ha explicado, siguiendo la cadena de mando, Dani pidió autorización de sus superiores para lanzar 2 misiles uno de los cuales no causó daños al avión según el testimonio de su piloto; aun cuando en el mando superior no detectaban la aeronave, el disparo fue autorizado, situación que sirvió de descargo al teniente coronel más tarde.
(16) Según fuentes serbias y la corroboración del testimonio de varios testigos y servicios secretos de otros paises, la misma noche del derribo del "Vega-31", otros dos F-117A pudieron ser alcanzados, uno habría sido víctima de un misil R-73 lanzado por un MiG-29B de la Escuadrilla de Caza N° 127 de la aviación yugoslava pilotado por el coronel Gvozden Djukic; el otro supuestamente fue dañado por fuego de artillería tubular Štvorguľomet vz.53; la OTAN no niega que ocurrieran tales incidentes pero nunca ha reconocido la pérdida o daño de otras aeronaves, argumentando increiblemente que en todos los casos se trata del mismo avión de Zelko, llevando al extremo la negación plausible; la extraña incompatibilidad entre el nombre del piloto sobreviviente y el que figura en la inscripción de la carlinga en los restos del avión 82-0806 ha sido objeto de no pocas especulaciones respecto al número de F-117A que pudieron haber caido esa noche. El desempeño de esta aeronave en ese conflicto fue duramente criticado en debates subsecuentes en el Congreso de EEUU y fue retirado de servicio prematuramente pocos años despues, en 2.008, aunque estaba prevista su operación hasta 2.025.
(17) El chasis cuya denominación industrial es WZT-1 corresponde a un vehículo de ingenieros de fabricacion polaca similar al BREM ruso basado en el bastidor del tanque T-55.
(18) Una breve explicación sobre este nuevo paradigma y sus elementos puede leerse el artículo "El Sistema Antiaéreo Antimisil 9K81M S-300VM 'Antey 2500' venezolano" del autor.
(19) Este comando sufrió una modificación orgánica y funcional para convertirse en el actual Comando de Operaciones de la Defensa Aeroespacial Integral, CODAI.
(20) Para obtener mas información sobre esta arma se puede consultar "El Sistema Lanzacohetes Múltiple Autopropulsado BM-21-1 'Grad' del Ejército Bolivariano", del autor.
(21) Estos blancos de practica están diseñados para simular aeronaves o misiles crucero con sección de cruce de radar desde 0,5 m2 y proporcionar una firma infrarroja perceptible a una distancia mínima de 5 km en condiciones meteorológicas de visibilidad de 1 km; según su fabricante, tambien pueden ser usados como diana por sistemas antiaéreos como el ADAMS Barak Mk.III, Saab/Bofors Dynamics RBS-70 y MBDA Mistral ATLAS; una variante IVTs-M3 esta dotada de equipo de interferencia radioeléctrica.
(22) Debido al alcance y características tecnológicas de las aeronaves y el armamento aerolanzable moderno, los parámetros actuales de la defensa aérea han variado, considerándose el umbral entre la defensa de área y la de punto una distancia de entre 15 y 18 km a partir del objetivo que se busca defender; a su vez, la defensa de punto también comprende la llamada "defensa terminal" que usa principalmente misiles de muy corto alcance del grupo denominado "portatiles" y artillería tubular.
Fuentes impresas:
Arancibia, P. (2.007). Chile-Perú: Una Década de Tensión 1970-1979. Serie Historica. Diario La Segunda. Empresa El Mercurio S.A.P. Santiago, Chile.
Bergquist, R. (1.988). The Role of Airpower in the Iran-Iraq War. Air University Press. Maxwell Air Force Base. Alabama, USA.
Chopite, J. (2.007). Reacción Inmediata para la Defensa Aerea. Revista Rasante, Edición Aniversario. Comando de la III Zona Aérea y Base Aérea El Libertador. Palo Negro, Edo. Aragua, Venezuela.
do Espírito Santo, G. (1.988). Soviet Actions in the Third World. Nação e Defesa. Instituto da Defesa Nacional. Lisboa, Portugal.
Gyürösi, M. (2.005). Rockets-powered Target Offers Infrared and Radar Signatures. Jane's Magazine, march 2.005. IHS Global Limited. London, U.K.
Martín, F. (2.008). Mirar al Futuro. Revista El Defensor, Edición N°02. Órgano Divulgativo del Comando de Operaciones de la Defensa Aérea. Palo Negro, Edo. Aragua, Venezuela.
Quinlivan, J. (1.989). Soviet Strategic Air Defense: A Long Past and an Uncertain Future. RAND Corporation. Santa Mónica, California. USA.
Romero, E. y Romero I. (2.016). Breve Historia de la Guerra de los Balcanes. Colección Breve Historia. Editorial Nowtilus S.L. Madrid, España.
Toperczer, I. (2.012). MiG-17 and MiG-19 Units of the Vietnam War. Osprey Combat Aircraft 25. Osprey Publishing.
Wertheim, E. (2007). Combat Fleets of the World. 15th Edition. Naval Institute Press. Annapolis, U.S.A.
Zaloga, S. (2.007). Red SAM: The SA-2 Guideline Anti-Aircraft Missile. New Vanguard 134. Osprey Publishing,
(1.955). Air Defense of the Sino-Soviet Bloc, 1955-1960. National Intelligece Estimate, Number 11-5-55. Central Intelligence Agency. Langley, Virginia. USA.
(2.014). Russian Air Defense Systems - Catalog 1. Defense Techs Ltd. Israel Ministry of Defense. Tel Aviv, Israel.
(2.016). The Military Balance 2016. International Institute for Strategic Studies. London, U.K.
Fuentes en línea:
Venezuela en proceso de "blindar" su espacio aéreo
Disponible en:
https://www.fav-club.com/2014/11/24/venezuela-en-el-proceso-de-blindar-su-espacio-aereo/
Venezuela incrementa su defensa con los sistemas antiaéreos rusos Buk y Pechora
Disponible en:
https://www.fav-club.com/2015/03/21/venezuela-incrementa-su-defensa-con-los-sistemas-antiaereos-rusos-buk-y-pechora/
FANB realizó ejercicios de sistemas misilísticos de defensa aérea y artillería coheteril
Disponible en:
https://www.fav-club.com/2015/04/16/fanb-realizo-ejercicio-de-sistemas-misilisticos-de-defensa-aerea-y-artilleria-coheteril/
Defending the Kremlin
Disponible en:
http://bobrowen.com/nymas/defendingthekremlin.htm
Surface-to-Air Missile System S-125-2D
Disponible en:
http://www.aerotechnica.ua/en/index.php?id=products∏=5&prodid=7
Military drone crashes show spread of drone wars.
Disponible en:
https://dronewars.net/2015/10/08/military-drones-crashes-show-spread-of-drone-wars/
Predator UAV lost over Syria
Disponible en:
https://www.airforcetimes.com/story/military/tech/2015/03/17/predator-uav-lost-over-syria/24933027/
U.S. Drone Crashed in Syria. Probably Shot Down by a Syrian SA-3 Surface to Air missile.
Disponible en:
https://theaviationist.com/2015/03/17/mq-1-shot-down-syria/
Almaz 5V24/5V27/S-125 Neva/Pechora Air Defence System / SA-3 Goa
Disponible en:
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-S-125-Neva.html
Venezuela compra baterías antiaéreas Pechora-M2 Siete países firmaron con Rusia un contrato de $250 millones para adquirir el sistema.
Disponible en:
http://www.eluniversal.com/2008/12/27/pol_art_venezuela-compra-bat_1203088.shtml
Sistemas antiaéreos rusos protegerán la mayor refinería venezolana.
Disponible en:
https://mundo.sputniknews.com/mundo/20120406153352736/
Sistema antiaéreo Pechora-2M: Un arma eficaz como el Kalashnikov.
Disponible en:
https://mundo.sputniknews.com/noticias/20081226119185315/
La FANB recibió nuevas unidades de misiles Pechora el universal.
Disponible en:
http://www.eluniversal.com/nacional-y-politica/140131/la-fanb-recibio-nuevas-unidades-de-misiles-pechora
Venezuela presenta el sistema misilístico antiaéreo S-125 Pechora 2M.
Disponible en:
http://www.infodefensa.com/latam/2012/01/25/noticia-venezuela-presenta-el-sistema-misilistico-antiaereo-s-125-pechora-2m.html
La Fuerza Aerea Revolucionaria hoy. Estado material actual y perspectivas.
Disponible en:
http://www.urrib2000.narod.ru/Mil-Hoy2.html
Legacy Air Defence System Upgrades.
Disponible en:
http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-Legacy-SAM-Upgrades.html
Misiles rusos a orillas del Nilo.
Disponible en:
http://www.voltairenet.org/article143877.html
El húngaro que derribó al avión invisible.
Disponible en:
http://cronicashungaras.blogspot.com/2009/05/el-hungaro-que-derribo-al-avion.html
Serbia 1999: el furtivo F117 de EEUU herido a muerte.
Disponible en:
https://mundo.sputniknews.com/spanish_ruvr_ru/2013_05_07/Serbia-1999-avion-furtivo-F117-EEUU-muerte/
La historia del piloto de la OTAN que se hizo amigo de quien trató de matarlo.
Disponible en:
http://www.lanacion.com.ar/1523887-otan
Serbia Keeps Downed US Stealth Bomber on Show
Disponible en:
http://www.balkaninsight.com/en/article/serbia-keeps-memory-on-fallen-nighthawk


Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil


Última edición por nick7777 el Vie Mar 03, 2017 10:06 pm, editado 2 veces
avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por gonzalojimenezm el Vie Mar 03, 2017 8:24 pm

Bueno, con eso se soluciona (risas), voy a ver entonces si recupero las foticos.
avatar
gonzalojimenezm

Mensajes : 207
Fecha de inscripción : 12/04/2016
Edad : 46
Localización : Venezuela

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por vudu 1 el Vie Mar 03, 2017 8:35 pm

BUEN Material..........

_________________
rastrear detectar y destruir infante listo¡¡¡¡¡
avatar
vudu 1
Admin

Mensajes : 1810
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016
Edad : 41

http://foromilitarvenezlano.forovenezuela.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por gonzalojimenezm el Vie Mar 03, 2017 9:03 pm

Gracias, antes del primer párrafo debería haber un subtitulo: "un hoyo en la empalizada", pero en ese site lo suprimen por formato.
avatar
gonzalojimenezm

Mensajes : 207
Fecha de inscripción : 12/04/2016
Edad : 46
Localización : Venezuela

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Sáb Abr 08, 2017 11:01 am

CEOFANB‏ [ltr]@ceofanb[/ltr]  18 h[size=1]Hace 18 horas
Más[/size]
@ceofanb a traves del @CODAI_FANB inmovilizó aeronave cerca de Encontrados, Zulia como parte de Guerra contra narcotráfico que libra la FANB





avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Lun Abr 24, 2017 2:56 pm



REDIGUA ...GURI
avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Lun Mayo 22, 2017 9:20 pm

avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por nick7777 el Jue Mayo 25, 2017 1:59 pm

MPPDefensa‏ [ltr]@prensaFANB[/ltr]  2 hHace 2 horas
[size=1]Más
[/size]
MG @PedroCastroRo supervisa demostración en terreno simulado del Sistema Pechora,en el 192 Grupo Misilistico de Defensa Antiaérea,Edo.Falcón







avatar
nick7777
Admin

Mensajes : 4014
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por vudu 1 el Vie Mayo 26, 2017 10:41 am

Por ahi le llegaron,   PEPINOS A ESTE SISTEMA...   OBSERVE SU TRASLADO...


AHH BUENO....

_________________
rastrear detectar y destruir infante listo¡¡¡¡¡
avatar
vudu 1
Admin

Mensajes : 1810
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016
Edad : 41

http://foromilitarvenezlano.forovenezuela.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por Chaco el Dom Mayo 28, 2017 5:31 pm

Compatriota vudú 1, lo bueno de esta zona es que se le puede suministrar por 3 vías terrestre, marítima y aérea, ya que dicha instalaciones está cerca del aeropuerto Josefa Camejo, donde también hay que acotar que dichos sistemas son totalmente móviles. Donde también sería inspeccionada por el Ministro de la Defensa.
avatar
Chaco
Admin

Mensajes : 10086
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016
Localización : Ciudad Mariana

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por vudu 1 el Lun Mayo 29, 2017 11:39 am

Es correcto, por eso es que anda hoy  por eso lares...  ahhh bueno  vean mis pronosticos...   ANDO  COMO LA ESTAMPA MILAGROSA  Y EL 5 Y 6  A COBRAR VENEZUELA JEJEJE...

_________________
rastrear detectar y destruir infante listo¡¡¡¡¡
avatar
vudu 1
Admin

Mensajes : 1810
Fecha de inscripción : 27/03/2016
Edad : 41

http://foromilitarvenezlano.forovenezuela.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: CODAI (Comando de Defensa Aeroespacial Integral)

Mensaje por Contenido patrocinado


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Página 8 de 11. Precedente  1, 2, 3 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  Siguiente

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba


 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.